ResearchPad - software-tools https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Robustness and parameter geography in post-translational modification systems]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14658 Biological organisms are often said to have robust properties but it is difficult to understand how such robustness arises from molecular interactions. Here, we use a mathematical model to study how the molecular mechanism of protein modification exhibits the property of multiple internal states, which has been suggested to underlie memory and decision making. The robustness of this property is revealed by the size and shape, or “geography,” of the parametric region in which the property holds. We use advances in reducing model complexity and in rapidly solving the underlying equations, to extensively sample parameter points in an 8-dimensional space. We find that under realistic molecular assumptions the size of the region is surprisingly small, suggesting that generating multiple internal states with such a mechanism is much harder than expected. While the shape of the region appears straightforward, we find surprising complexity in how the region grows with increasing amounts of the modified substrate. Our approach uses statistical analysis of data generated from a model, rather than from experiments, but leads to precise mathematical conjectures about parameter geography and biological robustness.

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<![CDATA[Determination of essential phenotypic elements of clusters in high-dimensional entities—DEPECHE]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c8accc7d5eed0c48498ffa7

Technological advances have facilitated an exponential increase in the amount of information that can be derived from single cells, necessitating new computational tools that can make such highly complex data interpretable. Here, we introduce DEPECHE, a rapid, parameter free, sparse k-means-based algorithm for clustering of multi- and megavariate single-cell data. In a number of computational benchmarks aimed at evaluating the capacity to form biologically relevant clusters, including flow/mass-cytometry and single cell RNA sequencing data sets with manually curated gold standard solutions, DEPECHE clusters as well or better than the currently available best performing clustering algorithms. However, the main advantage of DEPECHE, compared to the state-of-the-art, is its unique ability to enhance interpretability of the formed clusters, in that it only retains variables relevant for cluster separation, thereby facilitating computational efficient analyses as well as understanding of complex datasets. DEPECHE is implemented in the open source R package DepecheR currently available at github.com/Theorell/DepecheR.

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<![CDATA[Nuclear position relative to the Golgi body and nuclear orientation are differentially responsive indicators of cell polarized motility]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6dca31d5eed0c48452a8a8

Cell motility is critical to biological processes from wound healing to cancer metastasis to embryonic development. The involvement of organelles in cell motility is well established, but the role of organelle positional reorganization in cell motility remains poorly understood. Here we present an automated image analysis technique for tracking the shape and motion of Golgi bodies and cell nuclei. We quantify the relationship between nuclear orientation and the orientation of the Golgi body relative to the nucleus before, during, and after exposure of mouse fibroblasts to a controlled change in cell substrate topography, from flat to wrinkles, designed to trigger polarized motility. We find that the cells alter their mean nuclei orientation, in terms of the nuclear major axis, to increasingly align with the wrinkle direction once the wrinkles form on the substrate surface. This change in alignment occurs within 8 hours of completion of the topographical transition. In contrast, the position of the Golgi body relative to the nucleus remains aligned with the pre-programmed wrinkle direction, regardless of whether it has been fully established. These findings indicate that intracellular positioning of the Golgi body precedes nuclear reorientation during mouse fibroblast directed migration on patterned substrates. We further show that both processes are Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) mediated as they are abolished by pharmacologic ROCK inhibition whereas mouse fibroblast motility is unaffected. The automated image analysis technique introduced could be broadly employed in the study of polarization and other cellular processes in diverse cell types and micro-environments. In addition, having found that the nuclei Golgi vector may be a more sensitive indicator of substrate features than the nuclei orientation, we anticipate the nuclei Golgi vector to be a useful metric for researchers studying the dynamics of cell polarity in response to different micro-environments.

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<![CDATA[OpenCASA: A new open-source and scalable tool for sperm quality analysis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c4b7f54d5eed0c484841137

In the field of assisted reproductive techniques (ART), computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) systems have proved their utility and potential for assessing sperm quality, improving the prediction of the fertility potential of a seminal dose. Although most laboratories and scientific centers use commercial systems, in the recent years certain free and open-source alternatives have emerged that can reduce the costs that research groups have to face. However, these open-source alternatives cannot analyze sperm kinetic responses to different stimuli, such as chemotaxis, thermotaxis or rheotaxis. In addition, the programs released to date have not usually been designed to encourage the scalability and the continuity of software development. We have developed an open-source CASA software, called OpenCASA, which allows users to study three classical sperm quality parameters: motility, morphometry and membrane integrity (viability) and offers the possibility of analyzing the guided movement response of spermatozoa to different stimuli (useful for chemotaxis, thermotaxis or rheotaxis studies) or different motile cells such as bacteria, using a single software. This software has been released in a Version Control System at Github. This platform will allow researchers not only to download the software but also to be involved in and contribute to further developments. Additionally, a Google group has been created to allow the research community to interact and discuss OpenCASA. For validation of the OpenCASA software, we analysed different simulated sperm populations (for chemotaxis module) and evaluated 36 ejaculates obtained from 12 fertile rams using other sperm analysis systems (for motility, membrane integrity and morphology modules). The results were compared with those obtained by Open-CASA using the Pearson’s correlation and Bland-Altman tests, obtaining a high level of correlation in all parameters and a good agreement between the different used methods and the OpenCASA. With this work, we propose an open-source project oriented to the development of a new software application for sperm quality analysis. This proposed software will use a minimally centralized infrastructure to allow the continued development of its modules by the research community.

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<![CDATA[Ten simple rules for writing statistical book reviews]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c536c2bd5eed0c484a49b27

Statistical books can provide deep insights into statistics and software. There are, however, many resources available to the practitioner. Book reviews have the capacity to function as a critical mechanism for the learner to assess the merits of engaging in part, in full, or at all with a book. The “ten simple rules” format, pioneered in computational biology, was applied here to writing effective book reviews for statistics because of the wide breadth of offerings in this domain, including topical introductions, computational solutions, and theory. Learning by doing is a popular paradigm in statistics and computation, but there is still a niche for books in the pedagogy of self-taught and instruction-based learning. Primarily, these rules ensure that book reviews function as a form of short syntheses to inform and guide readers in deciding to use a specific book relative to other options for resolving statistical challenges.

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<![CDATA[Altitudinal range-size distribution of breeding birds and environmental factors for the determination of species richness: An empirical test of altitudinal Rapoport’s rule and non-directional rescue effect on a local scale]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6448bad5eed0c484c2ec96

Range-size distributions are important for understanding species richness patterns and led to the development of the controversial Rapoport’s rule and Rapoport-rescue effect. This study aimed to understand the relationship between species richness and range-size distribution in relation to environmental factors. The present study tested the following: (1) altitudinal Rapoport’s rule, and a subsequent test on climatic and ambient energy hypotheses, (2) non-directional rescue effect, and a subsequent test on effect of environmental factors associated with the distribution of narrowest to widest-range species. Altitudinal species range-size distribution increased with increasing altitude and showed a negative relationship with climatic variables. These results support the altitudinal Rapoport’s rule and climatic hypothesis; however, they do not fully support the ambient energy hypothesis. Results from testing the non-directional rescue effect showed that the inflow intensity of species from both directions (high and low elevations) affected species richness. And we found that the species with intermediate range-size, rather than narrowest or widest range-size were the main cause of a mid-peak of species richness and the non-directional rescue effect. Additionally, the richness of species with intermediate range-size was highly related to minimum temperature, habitat heterogeneity, or primary productivity. Although altitudinal range-size distribution results were similar to the phenomenon of altitudinal Rapoport’s rule, the mid-peak pattern of species richness could not be explained by the underlying mechanism of Rapoport’s-rescue effect; however, the non-directional rescue effect could explain a mid-peak pattern of species richness along altitudinal gradient.

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<![CDATA[EMBL2checklists: A Python package to facilitate the user-friendly submission of plant and fungal DNA barcoding sequences to ENA]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c40f7a5d5eed0c48438651a

Background

The submission of DNA sequences to public sequence databases is an essential, but insufficiently automated step in the process of generating and disseminating novel DNA sequence data. Despite the centrality of database submissions to biological research, the range of available software tools that facilitate the preparation of sequence data for database submissions is low, especially for sequences generated via plant and fungal DNA barcoding. Current submission procedures can be complex and prohibitively time expensive for any but a small number of input sequences. A user-friendly software tool is needed that streamlines the file preparation for database submissions of DNA sequences that are commonly generated in plant and fungal DNA barcoding.

Methods

A Python package was developed that converts DNA sequences from the common EMBL and GenBank flat file formats to submission-ready, tab-delimited spreadsheets (so-called ‘checklists’) for a subsequent upload to the annotated sequence section of the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA). The software tool, titled ‘EMBL2checklists’, automatically converts DNA sequences, their annotation features, and associated metadata into the idiosyncratic format of marker-specific ENA checklists and, thus, generates files that can be uploaded via the interactive Webin submission system of ENA.

Results

EMBL2checklists provides a simple, platform-independent tool that automates the conversion of common DNA barcoding sequences into easily editable spreadsheets that require no further processing but their upload to ENA via the interactive Webin submission system. The software is equipped with an intuitive graphical as well as an efficient command-line interface for its operation. The utility of the software is illustrated by its application in four recent investigations, including plant phylogenetic and fungal metagenomic studies.

Discussion

EMBL2checklists bridges the gap between common software suites for DNA sequence assembly and annotation and the interactive data submission process of ENA. It represents an easy-to-use solution for plant and fungal biologists without bioinformatics expertise to generate submission-ready checklists from common DNA sequence data. It allows the post-processing of checklists as well as work-sharing during the submission process and solves a critical bottleneck in the effort to increase participation in public data sharing.

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<![CDATA[Context-explorer: Analysis of spatially organized protein expression in high-throughput screens]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c366800d5eed0c4841a6d01

A growing body of evidence highlights the importance of the cellular microenvironment as a regulator of phenotypic and functional cellular responses to perturbations. We have previously developed cell patterning techniques to control population context parameters, and here we demonstrate context-explorer (CE), a software tool to improve investigation cell fate acquisitions through community level analyses. We demonstrate the capabilities of CE in the analysis of human and mouse pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs, mPSCs) patterned in colonies of defined geometries in multi-well plates. CE employs a density-based clustering algorithm to identify cell colonies. Using this automatic colony classification methodology, we reach accuracies comparable to manual colony counts in a fraction of the time, both in micropatterned and unpatterned wells. Classifying cells according to their relative position within a colony enables statistical analysis of spatial organization in protein expression within colonies. When applied to colonies of hPSCs, our analysis reveals a radial gradient in the expression of the transcription factors SOX2 and OCT4. We extend these analyses to colonies of different sizes and shapes and demonstrate how the metrics derived by CE can be used to asses the patterning fidelity of micropatterned plates. We have incorporated a number of features to enhance the usability and utility of CE. To appeal to a broad scientific community, all of the software’s functionality is accessible from a graphical user interface, and convenience functions for several common data operations are included. CE is compatible with existing image analysis programs such as CellProfiler and extends the analytical capabilities already provided by these tools. Taken together, CE facilitates investigation of spatially heterogeneous cell populations for fundamental research and drug development validation programs.

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<![CDATA[Ten simple rules for documenting scientific software]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c254517d5eed0c48442be5e ]]> <![CDATA[The DREAMS core package of interventions: A comprehensive approach to preventing HIV among adolescent girls and young women]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c141e8dd5eed0c484d2723a

In sub-Saharan Africa, adolescent girls and young women (AGYW) are 5 to 14 times more likely to be infected with HIV than their male peers. Every day, more than 750 AGYW are infected with HIV. Many factors make girls and young women particularly vulnerable to HIV, including gender-based violence, exclusion from economic opportunities, and a lack of access to secondary school. The President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) is dedicating significant resources through the Determined, Resilient, Empowered, AIDS-free, Mentored, and Safe (DREAMS) partnership to impact the lives of women and girls based on PEPFAR’s mission to help countries achieve epidemic control of HIV/AIDS. The data show that new HIV infections must be reduced in AGYW, or the global community risks losing the extensive progress made towards reaching epidemic control. With support from PEPFAR and private sector partners—the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Gilead Sciences, Girl Effect, Johnson & Johnson and ViiV Healthcare, DREAMS works together with partner governments to deliver a core package of interventions that combines evidence-based approaches that go beyond the health sector, addressing the structural drivers that directly and indirectly increase girls’ HIV risk. Not only is DREAMS an effort to reduce new HIV infections, but it aims to reduce other critical vulnerabilities such as gender-based violence. When girls and young women thrive, the effects are felt throughout their families, communities and countries.

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<![CDATA[MetaboSearch: Tool for Mass-Based Metabolite Identification Using Multiple Databases]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da9aab0ee8fa60ba3386

Searching metabolites against databases according to their masses is often the first step in metabolite identification for a mass spectrometry-based untargeted metabolomics study. Major metabolite databases include Human Metabolome DataBase (HMDB), Madison Metabolomics Consortium Database (MMCD), Metlin, and LIPID MAPS. Since each one of these databases covers only a fraction of the metabolome, integration of the search results from these databases is expected to yield a more comprehensive coverage. However, the manual combination of multiple search results is generally difficult when identification of hundreds of metabolites is desired. We have implemented a web-based software tool that enables simultaneous mass-based search against the four major databases, and the integration of the results. In addition, more complete chemical identifier information for the metabolites is retrieved by cross-referencing multiple databases. The search results are merged based on IUPAC International Chemical Identifier (InChI) keys. Besides a simple list of m/z values, the software can accept the ion annotation information as input for enhanced metabolite identification. The performance of the software is demonstrated on mass spectrometry data acquired in both positive and negative ionization modes. Compared with search results from individual databases, MetaboSearch provides better coverage of the metabolome and more complete chemical identifier information. Availability: The software tool is available at http://omics.georgetown.edu/MetaboSearch.html.

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<![CDATA[Automatic Assignment of Prokaryotic Genes to Functional Categories Using Literature Profiling]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da04ab0ee8fa60b7543c

In the last years, there was an exponential increase in the number of publicly available genomes. Once finished, most genome projects lack financial support to review annotations. A few of these gene annotations are based on a combination of bioinformatics evidence, however, in most cases, annotations are based solely on sequence similarity to a previously known gene, which was most probably annotated in the same way. As a result, a large number of predicted genes remain unassigned to any functional category despite the fact that there is enough evidence in the literature to predict their function. We developed a classifier trained with term-frequency vectors automatically disclosed from text corpora of an ensemble of genes representative of each functional category of the J. Craig Venter Institute Comprehensive Microbial Resource (JCVI-CMR) ontology. The classifier achieved up to 84% precision with 68% recall (for confidence≥0.4), F-measure 0.76 (recall and precision equally weighted) in an independent set of 2,220 genes, from 13 bacterial species, previously classified by JCVI-CMR into unambiguous categories of its ontology. Finally, the classifier assigned (confidence≥0.7) to functional categories a total of 5,235 out of the ∼24 thousand genes previously in categories “Unknown function” or “Unclassified” for which there is literature in MEDLINE. Two biologists reviewed the literature of 100 of these genes, randomly picket, and assigned them to the same functional categories predicted by the automatic classifier. Our results confirmed the hypothesis that it is possible to confidently assign genes of a real world repository to functional categories, based exclusively on the automatic profiling of its associated literature. The LitProf - Gene Classifier web server is accessible at: www.cebio.org/litprofGC.

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<![CDATA[Recursive Filtering for Zero Offset Correction of Diving Depth Time Series with GNU R Package diveMove]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9efab0ee8fa60b6dfbd

Zero offset correction of diving depth measured by time-depth recorders is required to remove artifacts arising from temporal changes in accuracy of pressure transducers. Currently used methods for this procedure are in the proprietary software domain, where researchers cannot study it in sufficient detail, so they have little or no control over how their data were changed. GNU R package diveMove implements a procedure in the Free Software domain that consists of recursively smoothing and filtering the input time series using moving quantiles. This paper describes, demonstrates, and evaluates the proposed method by using a “perfect” data set, which is subsequently corrupted to provide input for the proposed procedure. The method is evaluated by comparing the corrected time series to the original, uncorrupted, data set from an Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella Peters, 1875). The Root Mean Square Error of the corrected data set, relative to the “perfect” data set, was nearly identical to the magnitude of noise introduced into the latter. The method, thus, provides a flexible, reliable, and efficient mechanism to perform zero offset correction for analyses of diving behaviour. We illustrate applications of the method to data sets from four species with large differences in diving behaviour, measured using different sampling protocols and instrument characteristics.

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<![CDATA[From medical imaging data to 3D printed anatomical models]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5cab0ee8fa60be010f

Anatomical models are important training and teaching tools in the clinical environment and are routinely used in medical imaging research. Advances in segmentation algorithms and increased availability of three-dimensional (3D) printers have made it possible to create cost-efficient patient-specific models without expert knowledge. We introduce a general workflow that can be used to convert volumetric medical imaging data (as generated by Computer Tomography (CT)) to 3D printed physical models. This process is broken up into three steps: image segmentation, mesh refinement and 3D printing. To lower the barrier to entry and provide the best options when aiming to 3D print an anatomical model from medical images, we provide an overview of relevant free and open-source image segmentation tools as well as 3D printing technologies. We demonstrate the utility of this streamlined workflow by creating models of ribs, liver, and lung using a Fused Deposition Modelling 3D printer.

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<![CDATA[Ten simple rules to consider regarding preprint submission]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5cab0ee8fa60be03b4 ]]> <![CDATA[Hybrid Models and Biological Model Reduction with PyDSTool]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dae4ab0ee8fa60bbcddf

The PyDSTool software environment is designed to develop, simulate, and analyze dynamical systems models, particularly for biological applications. Unlike the engineering application focus and graphical specification environments of most general purpose simulation tools, PyDSTool provides a programmatic environment well suited to exploratory data- and hypothesis-driven biological modeling problems. In this work, we show how the environment facilitates the application of hybrid dynamical modeling to the reverse engineering of complex biophysical dynamics; in this case, of an excitable membrane. The example demonstrates how the software provides novel tools that support the inference and validation of mechanistic hypotheses and the inclusion of data constraints in both quantitative and qualitative ways. The biophysical application is broadly relevant to models in the biosciences. The open source and platform-independent PyDSTool package is freely available under the BSD license from http://sourceforge.net/projects/pydstool/. The hosting service provides links to documentation and online forums for user support.

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<![CDATA[Evaluating alignment and variant-calling software for mutation identification in C. elegans by whole-genome sequencing]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db50ab0ee8fa60bdc06e

Whole-genome sequencing is a powerful tool for analyzing genetic variation on a global scale. One particularly useful application is the identification of mutations obtained by classical phenotypic screens in model species. Sequence data from the mutant strain is aligned to the reference genome, and then variants are called to generate a list of candidate alleles. A number of software pipelines for mutation identification have been targeted to C. elegans, with particular emphasis on ease of use, incorporation of mapping strain data, subtraction of background variants, and similar criteria. Although success is predicated upon the sensitive and accurate detection of candidate alleles, relatively little effort has been invested in evaluating the underlying software components that are required for mutation identification. Therefore, we have benchmarked a number of commonly used tools for sequence alignment and variant calling, in all pair-wise combinations, against both simulated and actual datasets. We compared the accuracy of those pipelines for mutation identification in C. elegans, and found that the combination of BBMap for alignment plus FreeBayes for variant calling offers the most robust performance.

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<![CDATA[Automated Tracking of Animal Posture and Movement during Exploration and Sensory Orientation Behaviors]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989daf4ab0ee8fa60bc2706

Background

The nervous functions of an organism are primarily reflected in the behavior it is capable of. Measuring behavior quantitatively, at high-resolution and in an automated fashion provides valuable information about the underlying neural circuit computation. Accordingly, computer-vision applications for animal tracking are becoming a key complementary toolkit to genetic, molecular and electrophysiological characterization in systems neuroscience.

Methodology/Principal Findings

We present Sensory Orientation Software (SOS) to measure behavior and infer sensory experience correlates. SOS is a simple and versatile system to track body posture and motion of single animals in two-dimensional environments. In the presence of a sensory landscape, tracking the trajectory of the animal's sensors and its postural evolution provides a quantitative framework to study sensorimotor integration. To illustrate the utility of SOS, we examine the orientation behavior of fruit fly larvae in response to odor, temperature and light gradients. We show that SOS is suitable to carry out high-resolution behavioral tracking for a wide range of organisms including flatworms, fishes and mice.

Conclusions/Significance

Our work contributes to the growing repertoire of behavioral analysis tools for collecting rich and fine-grained data to draw and test hypothesis about the functioning of the nervous system. By providing open-access to our code and documenting the software design, we aim to encourage the adaptation of SOS by a wide community of non-specialists to their particular model organism and questions of interest.

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<![CDATA[Sam2bam: High-Performance Framework for NGS Data Preprocessing Tools]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9f2ab0ee8fa60b6ecbb

This paper introduces a high-throughput software tool framework called sam2bam that enables users to significantly speed up pre-processing for next-generation sequencing data. The sam2bam is especially efficient on single-node multi-core large-memory systems. It can reduce the runtime of data pre-processing in marking duplicate reads on a single node system by 156–186x compared with de facto standard tools. The sam2bam consists of parallel software components that can fully utilize multiple processors, available memory, high-bandwidth storage, and hardware compression accelerators, if available. The sam2bam provides file format conversion between well-known genome file formats, from SAM to BAM, as a basic feature. Additional features such as analyzing, filtering, and converting input data are provided by using plug-in tools, e.g., duplicate marking, which can be attached to sam2bam at runtime. We demonstrated that sam2bam could significantly reduce the runtime of next generation sequencing (NGS) data pre-processing from about two hours to about one minute for a whole-exome data set on a 16-core single-node system using up to 130 GB of memory. The sam2bam could reduce the runtime of NGS data pre-processing from about 20 hours to about nine minutes for a whole-genome sequencing data set on the same system using up to 711 GB of memory.

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<![CDATA[Accuracy of Estimation of Graft Size for Living-Related Liver Transplantation: First Results of a Semi-Automated Interactive Software for CT-Volumetry]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989daedab0ee8fa60bbfbfa

Objectives

To evaluate accuracy of estimated graft size for living-related liver transplantation using a semi-automated interactive software for CT-volumetry.

Materials and Methods

Sixteen donors for living-related liver transplantation (11 male; mean age: 38.2±9.6 years) underwent contrast-enhanced CT prior to graft removal. CT-volumetry was performed using a semi-automated interactive software (P), and compared with a manual commercial software (TR). For P, liver volumes were provided either with or without vessels. For TR, liver volumes were provided always with vessels. Intraoperative weight served as reference standard. Major study goals included analyses of volumes using absolute numbers, linear regression analyses and inter-observer agreements. Minor study goals included the description of the software workflow: degree of manual correction, speed for completion, and overall intuitiveness using five-point Likert scales: 1–markedly lower/faster/higher for P compared with TR, 2–slightly lower/faster/higher for P compared with TR, 3–identical for P and TR, 4–slightly lower/faster/higher for TR compared with P, and 5–markedly lower/faster/higher for TR compared with P.

Results

Liver segments II/III, II–IV and V–VIII served in 6, 3, and 7 donors as transplanted liver segments. Volumes were 642.9±368.8 ml for TR with vessels, 623.8±349.1 ml for P with vessels, and 605.2±345.8 ml for P without vessels (P<0.01). Regression equations between intraoperative weights and volumes were y = 0.94x+30.1 (R2 = 0.92; P<0.001) for TR with vessels, y = 1.00x+12.0 (R2 = 0.92; P<0.001) for P with vessels, and y = 1.01x+28.0 (R2 = 0.92; P<0.001) for P without vessels. Inter-observer agreement showed a bias of 1.8 ml for TR with vessels, 5.4 ml for P with vessels, and 4.6 ml for P without vessels. For the degree of manual correction, speed for completion and overall intuitiveness, scale values were 2.6±0.8, 2.4±0.5 and 2.

Conclusions

CT-volumetry performed with P can predict accurately graft size for living-related liver transplantation while improving workflow compared with TR.

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