ResearchPad - statistical-physics https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Deterministic analysis of extrinsic and intrinsic noise in an epidemiological model]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_8218 We couple a stochastic collocation method with an analytical expansion of the canonical epidemiological master equation to analyze the effects of both extrinsic and intrinsic noise. It is shown that depending on the distribution of the extrinsic noise, the master equation yields quantitatively different results compared to using the expectation of the distribution for the stochastic parameter. This difference is incident to the nonlinear terms in the master equation, and we show that the deviation away from the expectation of the extrinsic noise scales nonlinearly with the variance of the distribution. The method presented here converges linearly with respect to the number of particles in the system and exponentially with respect to the order of the polynomials used in the stochastic collocation calculation. This makes the method presented here more accurate than standard Monte Carlo methods, which suffer from slow, nonmonotonic convergence. In epidemiological terms, the results show that extrinsic fluctuations should be taken into account since they effect the speed of disease breakouts and that the gamma distribution should be used to model the basic reproductive number.

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<![CDATA[Limitations of discrete-time approaches to continuous-time contagion dynamics]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_8217 Continuous-time Markov process models of contagions are widely studied, not least because of their utility in predicting the evolution of real-world contagions and in formulating control measures. It is often the case, however, that discrete-time approaches are employed to analyze such models or to simulate them numerically. In such cases, time is discretized into uniform steps and transition rates between states are replaced by transition probabilities. In this paper, we illustrate potential limitations to this approach. We show how discretizing time leads to a restriction on the values of the model parameters that can accurately be studied. We examine numerical simulation schemes employed in the literature, showing how synchronous-type updating schemes can bias discrete-time formalisms when compared against continuous-time formalisms. Event-based simulations, such as the Gillespie algorithm, are proposed as optimal simulation schemes both in terms of replicating the continuous-time process and computational speed. Finally, we show how discretizing time can affect the value of the epidemic threshold for large values of the infection rate and the recovery rate, even if the ratio between the former and the latter is small.

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<![CDATA[Critical behavior of a two-step contagion model with multiple seeds]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_8200 A two-step contagion model with a single seed serves as a cornerstone for understanding the critical behaviors and underlying mechanism of discontinuous percolation transitions induced by cascade dynamics. When the contagion spreads from a single seed, a cluster of infected and recovered nodes grows without any cluster merging process. However, when the contagion starts from multiple seeds of O(N) where N is the system size, a node weakened by a seed can be infected more easily when it is in contact with another node infected by a different pathogen seed. This contagion process can be viewed as a cluster merging process in a percolation model. Here we show analytically and numerically that when the density of infectious seeds is relatively small but O(1), the epidemic transition is hybrid, exhibiting both continuous and discontinuous behavior, whereas when it is sufficiently large and reaches a critical point, the transition becomes continuous. We determine the full set of critical exponents describing the hybrid and the continuous transitions. Their critical behaviors differ from those in the single-seed case.

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<![CDATA[Stochastic dynamics for reinfection by transmitted diseases]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7183 The use of stochastic models to study the dynamics of infectious diseases is an important tool to understand the epidemiological process. For several directly transmitted diseases, reinfection is a relevant process, which can be expressed by endogenous reactivation of the pathogen or by exogenous reinfection due to direct contact with an infected individual (with smaller reinfection rate σβ than infection rate β). In this paper, we examine the stochastic susceptible, infected, recovered, infected (SIRI) model simulating the endogenous reactivation by a spontaneous reaction, while exogenous reinfection by a catalytic reaction. Analyzing the mean-field approximations of a site and pairs of sites, and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for the particular case of exogenous reinfection, we obtained continuous phase transitions involving endemic, epidemic, and no transmission phases for the simple approach; the approach of pairs is better to describe the phase transition from endemic phase (susceptible, infected, susceptible (SIS)-like model) to epidemic phase (susceptible, infected, and removed or recovered (SIR)-like model) considering the comparison with MC results; the reinfection increases the peaks of outbreaks until the system reaches endemic phase. For the particular case of endogenous reactivation, the approach of pairs leads to a continuous phase transition from endemic phase (SIS-like model) to no transmission phase. Finally, there is no phase transition when both effects are taken into account. We hope the results of this study can be generalized for the susceptible, exposed, infected, and removed or recovered (SEIRIE) model, for which the state exposed (infected but not infectious), describing more realistically transmitted diseases such as tuberculosis. In future work, we also intend to investigate the effect of network topology on phase transitions when the SIRI model describes both transmitted diseases (σ<1) and social contagions (σ>1).

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