ResearchPad - substitution-mutation https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Identification and detection of a novel point mutation in the Chitin Synthase gene of <i>Culex pipiens</i> associated with diflubenzuron resistance]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14502 Diflubenzuron is one of the main larvicides used for the control of the West Nile Virus vector Culex pipiens in the Mediterranean. However, the efficiency of control is now under threat due to the selection of insecticide resistance. Two point mutations were previously identified at the Chitin synthase and shown to confer low and high levels of resistance and a diagnostic was developed to monitor the trait. This study reports the identification of a third mutation associated with high levels of diflubenzuron resistance in Italy. This mutation was also detected in France, whereas no resistance mutations were found in Cx. pipiens mosquitoes sampled from Greece, Portugal and Israel. The findings are of major concern for mosquito control programs in S. Europe, which rely on the use of a limited number of larvicides.

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<![CDATA[Autosomal recessive congenital cataracts linked to HSF4 in a consanguineous Pakistani family]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Na302ecef-6336-4a97-9663-2461453833de

Purpose

To investigate the genetic basis of autosomal recessive congenital cataracts (arCC) in a large consanguineous Pakistani family.

Methods

All participating members of family, PKCC074 underwent an ophthalmic examination. Slit-lamp photographs were ascertained for affected individuals that have not been operated for the removal of the cataractous lens. A small aliquot of the blood sample was collected from all participating individuals and genomic DNAs were extracted. A genome-wide scan was performed with polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) markers and the logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. All coding exons and exon-intron boundaries of HSF4 were sequenced and expression of Hsf4 in mouse ocular lens was investigated. The C-terminal FLAG-tagged wild-type and mutant HSF4b constructs were prepared to examine the nuclear localization pattern of the mutant protein.

Results

The ophthalmological examinations suggested that nuclear cataracts are present in affected individuals. Genome-wide linkage analyses localized the critical interval to a 10.95 cM (14.17 Mb) interval on chromosome 16q with a maximum two-point LOD score of 4.51 at θ = 0. Sanger sequencing identified a novel missense mutation: c.433G>C (p.Ala145Pro) that segregated with the disease phenotype in the family and was not present in ethnically matched controls. Real-time PCR analysis identified the expression of HSF4 in mouse lens as early as embryonic day 15 with a steady level of expression thereafter. The immunofluorescence tracking confirmed that both wild-type and mutant HSF4 (p.Ala145Pro) proteins localized to the nucleus.

Conclusion

Here, we report a novel missense mutation in HSF4 associated with arCC in a familial case of Pakistani descent.

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<![CDATA[Integrated structural variation and point mutation signatures in cancer genomes using correlated topic models]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c99020ad5eed0c484b97533

Mutation signatures in cancer genomes reflect endogenous and exogenous mutational processes, offering insights into tumour etiology, features for prognostic and biologic stratification and vulnerabilities to be exploited therapeutically. We present a novel machine learning formalism for improved signature inference, based on multi-modal correlated topic models (MMCTM) which can at once infer signatures from both single nucleotide and structural variation counts derived from cancer genome sequencing data. We exemplify the utility of our approach on two hormone driven, DNA repair deficient cancers: breast and ovary (n = 755 samples total). We show how introducing correlated structure both within and between modes of mutation can increase accuracy of signature discovery, particularly in the context of sparse data. Our study emphasizes the importance of integrating multiple mutation modes for signature discovery and patient stratification, and provides a statistical modeling framework to incorporate additional features of interest for future studies.

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<![CDATA[Interaction between the transmembrane domains of Sho1 and Opy2 enhances the signaling efficiency of the Hog1 MAP kinase cascade in Saccharomyces cerevisiae]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c57e68cd5eed0c484ef36b5

To cope with increased extracellular osmolarity, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae activates the Hog1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which controls a variety of adaptive responses. Hog1 is activated through the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway, which consists of a core MAPK cascade and two independent upstream branches (SHO1 and SLN1 branches) containing distinct osmosensing machineries. In the SHO1 branch, a homo-oligomer of Sho1, the four-transmembrane (TM) osmosensor, interacts with the transmembrane co-osmosensors, Hkr1 and Msb2, and the membrane anchor protein Opy2, through their TM domains, and activates the Ste20-Ste11-Pbs2-Hog1 kinase cascade. In this study, we isolated and analyzed hyperactive mutants of Sho1 and Opy2 that harbor mutations within their TM domains. Several hyperactive mutations enhanced the interaction between Sho1 and Opy2, indicating the importance of the TM-mediated interaction between Sho1 and Opy2 for facilitating effective signaling. The interaction between the TM domains of Sho1 and Opy2 will place their respective cytoplasmic binding partners Pbs2 and Ste11 in close proximity. Indeed, genetic analyses of the mutants showed that the Sho1-Opy2 interaction enhances the activation of Pbs2 by Ste11, but not Hog1 by Pbs2. Some of the hyperactive mutants had mutations at the extracellular ends of either Sho1 TM4 or Opy2 TM, and defined the Sho1-Opy2 binding site 1 (BS1). Chemical crosslinking and mutational analyses revealed that the cytoplasmic ends of Sho1 TM1 and Opy2 TM also interact with each other, defining the Sho1-Opy2 binding site 2 (BS2). A geometric consideration constrains that one Opy2 molecule must interact with two adjacent Sho1 molecules in Sho1 oligomer. These results raise a possibility that an alteration of the conformation of the Sho1-Opy2 complex might contributes to the osmotic activation of the Hog1 MAPK cascade.

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<![CDATA[Analysis of antifungal resistance genes in Candida albicans and Candida glabrata using next generation sequencing]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c40f7d3d5eed0c484386a4b

Introduction/Objectives

An increase in antifungal resistant Candida strains has been reported in recent years. The aim of this study was to detect mutations in resistance genes of azole-resistant, echinocandin-resistant or multi-resistant strains using next generation sequencing technology, which allows the analysis of multiple resistance mechanisms in a high throughput setting.

Methods

Forty clinical Candida isolates (16 C. albicans and 24 C. glabrata strains) with MICs for azoles and echinocandins above the clinical EUCAST breakpoint were examined. The genes ERG11, ERG3, TAC1 and GSC1 (FKS1) in C. albicans, as well as ERG11, CgPDR1, FKS1 and FKS2 in C. glabrata were sequenced.

Results

Fifty-four different missense mutations were identified, 13 of which have not been reported before. All nine echinocandin-resistant Candida isolates showed mutations in the hot spot (HS) regions of FKS1, FKS2 or GSC1. In ERG3 two homozygous premature stop codons were identified in two highly azole-resistant and moderately echinocandin-resistant C. albicans strains. Seven point mutations in ERG11 were determined in azole-resistant C. albicans whereas in azole-resistant C. glabrata, no ERG11 mutations were detected. In 10 out of 13 azole-resistant C. glabrata, 12 different potential gain-of-function mutations in the transcription factor CgPDR1 were verified, which are associated with an overexpression of the efflux pumps CDR1/2.

Conclusion

This study showed that next generation sequencing allows the thorough investigation of a large number of isolates more cost efficient and faster than conventional Sanger sequencing. Targeting different resistance genes and a large sample size of highly resistant strains allows a better determination of the relevance of the different mutations, and to differentiate between causal mutations and polymorphisms.

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<![CDATA[Wagging the long tail of drivers of prostate cancer]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c61b7c9d5eed0c484937fa7 ]]> <![CDATA[PremPDI estimates and interprets the effects of missense mutations on protein-DNA interactions]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c19668dd5eed0c484b52351

Protein-DNA interactions play important roles in regulations of many vital cellular processes, including transcription, translation, DNA replication and recombination. Sequence variants occurring in these DNA binding proteins that alter protein-DNA interactions may cause significant perturbations or complete abolishment of function, potentially leading to diseases. Developing a mechanistic understanding of impacts of variants on protein-DNA interactions becomes a persistent need. To address this need we introduce a new computational method PremPDI that predicts the effect of single missense mutation in the protein on the protein-DNA interaction and calculates the quantitative binding affinity change. The PremPDI method is based on molecular mechanics force fields and fast side-chain optimization algorithms with parameters optimized on experimental sets of 219 mutations from 49 protein-DNA complexes. PremPDI yields a very good agreement between predicted and experimental values with Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.71 and root-mean-square error of 0.86 kcal mol-1. The PremPDI server could map mutations on a structural protein-DNA complex, calculate the associated changes in binding affinity, determine the deleterious effect of a mutation, and produce a mutant structural model for download. PremPDI can be applied to many tasks, such as determination of potential damaging mutations in cancer and other diseases. PremPDI is available at http://lilab.jysw.suda.edu.cn/research/PremPDI/.

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<![CDATA[Deleterious mitochondrial DNA point mutations are overrepresented in Drosophila expressing a proofreading-defective DNA polymerase γ]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5bfc6269d5eed0c484ec8fa8

Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations cause severe maternally inherited syndromes and the accumulation of somatic mtDNA mutations is implicated in aging and common diseases. However, the mechanisms that influence the frequency and pathogenicity of mtDNA mutations are poorly understood. To address this matter, we created a Drosophila mtDNA mutator strain expressing a proofreading-deficient form of the mitochondrial DNA polymerase. Mutator flies have a dramatically increased somatic mtDNA mutation frequency that correlates with the dosage of the proofreading-deficient polymerase. Mutator flies also exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction, shortened lifespan, a progressive locomotor deficit, and loss of dopaminergic neurons. Surprisingly, the frequency of nonsynonymous, pathogenic, and conserved-site mutations in mutator flies exceeded predictions of a neutral mutational model, indicating the existence of a positive selection mechanism that favors deleterious mtDNA variants. We propose from these findings that deleterious mtDNA mutations are overrepresented because they selectively evade quality control surveillance or because they are amplified through compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis.

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<![CDATA[A genome-wide association analysis reveals a potential role for recombination in the evolution of antimicrobial resistance in Burkholderia multivorans]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c141e6ad5eed0c484d267bc

Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung infections caused by members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, such as Burkholderia multivorans, are associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity. We performed a population genomics study of 111 B. multivorans sputum isolates from one CF patient through three stages of infection including an early incident isolate, deep sampling of a one-year period of chronic infection occurring weeks before a lung transplant, and deep sampling of a post-transplant infection. We reconstructed the evolutionary history of the population and used a lineage-controlled genome-wide association study (GWAS) approach to identify genetic variants associated with antibiotic resistance. We found the incident isolate was basally related to the rest of the strains and more susceptible to antibiotics from three classes (β-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones). The chronic infection isolates diversified into multiple, distinct genetic lineages and showed reduced antimicrobial susceptibility to the same antibiotics. The post-transplant reinfection isolates derived from the same source as the incident isolate and were genetically distinct from the chronic isolates. They also had a level of susceptibility in between that of the incident and chronic isolates. We identified numerous examples of potential parallel pathoadaptation, in which multiple mutations were found in the same locus or even codon. The set of parallel pathoadaptive loci was enriched for functions associated with virulence and resistance. Our GWAS analysis identified statistical associations between a polymorphism in the ampD locus with resistance to β-lactams, and polymorphisms in an araC transcriptional regulator and an outer membrane porin with resistance to both aminoglycosides and quinolones. Additionally, these three loci were independently mutated four, three and two times, respectively, providing further support for parallel pathoadaptation. Finally, we identified a minimum of 14 recombination events, and observed that loci carrying putative parallel pathoadaptations and polymorphisms statistically associated with β-lactam resistance were over-represented in these recombinogenic regions.

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<![CDATA[Multiple configurations of EGFR exon 20 resistance mutations after first- and third-generation EGFR TKI treatment affect treatment options in NSCLC]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c06f036d5eed0c484c6d3c8

After sequential treatment with first- and third-generation EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancers frequently harbor multiple resistance mutations in exon 20 of EGFR including T790M, mediating resistance to first-generation TKIs, and at codons 792, 796, or 797 mediating resistance to third-generation TKIs. However, whether these resistance mutations are in cis or trans has therapeutic implications for patients. We analyzed a cohort of 29 patients with NSCLC harboring EGFR mutations at codons 792, 796, or 797 to establish the configuration of these mutations. We performed hybrid capture-based, next-generation sequencing on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsy tissue or liquid biopsy. 27 samples had both a T790M mutation and a mutation at codons 792, 796, or 797. In all of these cases, the mutations were found in the cis configuration; the trans configuration was not observed. Two patients’ samples harbored a mutation at codon 797 but no T790M mutation. In these two cases, longitudinal analysis showed earlier biopsies harbored EGFR T790M, which was undetectable following osimertinib treatment. Treatment of one these patients with both first- and third-generation EGFR TKIs resulted in a mixed response. Here we describe multiple configurations of EGFR T790M and third-generation TKI resistance mutations at codons 792, 796, and 797. These mutations are most commonly found in cis, which confers resistance to all current EGFR TKIs. We also describe two patients that exhibited T790M loss with acquisition of a mutation at codon 797. In addition, one of these patients, with an EGFR C797S in a lung biopsy was subsequently found to have EGFR C797N in a later biopsy of pleural fluid, highlighting the dynamic multiclonal nature of advanced NSCLC.

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<![CDATA[Development of ultra-short PCR assay to reveal BRAF V600 mutation status in Thai colorectal cancer tissues]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5b28b870463d7e14181b184d

The protein kinase BRAF is one of the key players in regulating cellular responses to extracellular signals. Somatic mutations of the BRAF gene, causing constitutive activation of BRAF, have been found in various types of human cancers such as malignant melanoma, and colorectal cancer. BRAF V600E and V600K, most commonly observed mutations in these cancers, may predict response to targeted therapies. Many techniques suffer from a lack of diagnostic sensitivity in mutation analysis in clinical samples with a low cancer cell percentage or poor-quality fragmented DNA. Here we present allele-specific real-time PCR assay for amplifying 35- to 45-base target sequences in BRAF gene. Forward primer designed for BRAF V600E detection is capable of recognizing both types of BRAF V600E mutation, i.e. V600E1 (c.1799T>A) and V600E2 (c.1799_1800delTGinsAA), as well as complex tandem mutation caused by nucleotide changes in codons 600 and 601. We utilized this assay to analyze Thai formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. Forty-eight percent of 178 Thai colorectal cancer tissues has KRAS mutation detected by highly sensitive commercial assays. Although these DNA samples contain low overall yield of amplifiable DNA, our newly-developed assay successfully revealed BRAF V600 mutations in 6 of 93 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded colorectal cancer tissues which KRAS mutation was not detected. Ultra-short PCR assay with forward mutation-specific primers is potentially useful to detect BRAF V600 mutations in highly fragmented DNA specimens from cancer patients.

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<![CDATA[Step-Wise Increase in Tigecycline Resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae Associated with Mutations in ramR, lon and rpsJ]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9e8ab0ee8fa60b6bf4d

Klebsiella pneumoniae is a gram-negative bacterium that causes numerous diseases, including pneumonia and urinary tract infections. An increase in multidrug resistance has complicated the treatment of these bacterial infections, and although tigecycline shows activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria, resistant strains have emerged. In this study, the whole genomes of two clinical and six laboratory-evolved strains were sequenced to identify putative mutations related to tigecycline resistance. Of seven tigecycline-resistant strains, seven (100%) had ramR mutations, five (71.4%) had lon mutations, one (14.2%) had a ramA mutation, and one (14.2%) had an rpsJ mutation. A higher fitness cost was observed in the laboratory-evolved strains but not in the clinical strains. A transcriptome analysis demonstrated high expression of the ramR operon and acrA in all tigecycline-resistant strains. Genes involved in nitrogen metabolism were induced in the laboratory-evolved strains compared with the wild-type and clinical strains, and this difference in nitrogen metabolism reflected the variation between the laboratory-evolved and the clinical strains. Complementation experiments showed that both the wild-type ramR and the lon genes could partially restore the tigecycline sensitivity of K. pneumoniae. We believe that this manuscript describes the first construct of a lon mutant in K. pneumoniae, which allowed confirmation of its association with tigecycline resistance. Our findings illustrate the importance of the ramR operon and the lon and rpsJ genes in K. pneumoniae resistance to tigecycline.

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<![CDATA[Molecular Basis and Therapeutic Strategies to Rescue Factor IX Variants That Affect Splicing and Protein Function]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da6fab0ee8fa60b942e6

Mutations that result in amino acid changes can affect both pre-mRNA splicing and protein function. Understanding the combined effect is essential for correct diagnosis and for establishing the most appropriate therapeutic strategy at the molecular level. We have identified a series of disease-causing splicing mutations in coagulation factor IX (FIX) exon 5 that are completely recovered by a modified U1snRNP particle, through an SRSF2-dependent enhancement mechanism. We discovered that synonymous mutations and missense substitutions associated to a partial FIX secretion defect represent targets for this therapy as the resulting spliced-corrected proteins maintains normal FIX coagulant specific activity. Thus, splicing and protein alterations contribute to define at the molecular level the disease-causing effect of a number of exonic mutations in coagulation FIX exon 5. In addition, our results have a significant impact in the development of splicing-switching therapies in particular for mutations that affect both splicing and protein function where increasing the amount of a correctly spliced protein can circumvent the basic functional defects.

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<![CDATA[Mutational Biases Drive Elevated Rates of Substitution at Regulatory Sites across Cancer Types]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dacdab0ee8fa60bb4cbc

Disruption of gene regulation is known to play major roles in carcinogenesis and tumour progression. Here, we comprehensively characterize the mutational profiles of diverse transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) across 1,574 completely sequenced cancer genomes encompassing 11 tumour types. We assess the relative rates and impact of the mutational burden at the binding sites of 81 transcription factors (TFs), by comparing the abundance and patterns of single base substitutions within putatively functional binding sites to control sites with matched sequence composition. There is a strong (1.43-fold) and significant excess of mutations at functional binding sites across TFs, and the mutations that accumulate in cancers are typically more disruptive than variants tolerated in extant human populations at the same sites. CTCF binding sites suffer an exceptionally high mutational load in cancer (3.31-fold excess) relative to control sites, and we demonstrate for the first time that this effect is seen in essentially all cancer types with sufficient data. The sub-set of CTCF sites involved in higher order chromatin structures has the highest mutational burden, suggesting a widespread breakdown of chromatin organization. However, we find no evidence for selection driving these distinctive patterns of mutation. The mutational load at CTCF-binding sites is substantially determined by replication timing and the mutational signature of the tumor in question, suggesting that selectively neutral processes underlie the unusual mutation patterns. Pervasive hyper-mutation within transcription factor binding sites rewires the regulatory landscape of the cancer genome, but it is dominated by mutational processes rather than selection.

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<![CDATA[Evolutionary forces affecting synonymous variations in plant genomes]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5cab0ee8fa60be03d5

Base composition is highly variable among and within plant genomes, especially at third codon positions, ranging from GC-poor and homogeneous species to GC-rich and highly heterogeneous ones (particularly Monocots). Consequently, synonymous codon usage is biased in most species, even when base composition is relatively homogeneous. The causes of these variations are still under debate, with three main forces being possibly involved: mutational bias, selection and GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC). So far, both selection and gBGC have been detected in some species but how their relative strength varies among and within species remains unclear. Population genetics approaches allow to jointly estimating the intensity of selection, gBGC and mutational bias. We extended a recently developed method and applied it to a large population genomic dataset based on transcriptome sequencing of 11 angiosperm species spread across the phylogeny. We found that at synonymous positions, base composition is far from mutation-drift equilibrium in most genomes and that gBGC is a widespread and stronger process than selection. gBGC could strongly contribute to base composition variation among plant species, implying that it should be taken into account in plant genome analyses, especially for GC-rich ones.

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<![CDATA[Mutation Rate Variation is a Primary Determinant of the Distribution of Allele Frequencies in Humans]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da8bab0ee8fa60b9e083

The site frequency spectrum (SFS) has long been used to study demographic history and natural selection. Here, we extend this summary by examining the SFS conditional on the alleles found at the same site in other species. We refer to this extension as the “phylogenetically-conditioned SFS” or cSFS. Using recent large-sample data from the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC), combined with primate genome sequences, we find that human variants that occurred independently in closely related primate lineages are at higher frequencies in humans than variants with parallel substitutions in more distant primates. We show that this effect is largely due to sites with elevated mutation rates causing significant departures from the widely-used infinite sites mutation model. Our analysis also suggests substantial variation in mutation rates even among mutations involving the same nucleotide changes. In summary, we show that variable mutation rates are key determinants of the SFS in humans.

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<![CDATA[FANCA Gene Mutations with 8 Novel Molecular Changes in Indian Fanconi Anemia Patients]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da04ab0ee8fa60b75441

Fanconi anemia (FA), a rare heterogeneous genetic disorder, is known to be associated with 19 genes and a spectrum of clinical features. We studied FANCA molecular changes in 34 unrelated and 2 siblings of Indian patients with FA and have identified 26 different molecular changes of FANCA gene, of which 8 were novel mutations (a small deletion c.2500delC, 4 non-sense mutations c.2182C>T, c.2630C>G, c.3677C>G, c.3189G>A; and 3 missense mutations; c.1273G>C, c.3679 G>C, and c.3992 T>C). Among these only 16 patients could be assigned FA-A complementation group, because we could not confirm single exon deletions detected by MLPA or cDNA amplification by secondary confirmation method and due to presence of heterozygous non-pathogenic variations or heterozygous pathogenic mutations. An effective molecular screening strategy should be developed for confirmation of these mutations and determining the breakpoints for single exon deletions.

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<![CDATA[The Panitumumab EGFR Complex Reveals a Binding Mechanism That Overcomes Cetuximab Induced Resistance]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dab9ab0ee8fa60bade78

Panitumumab and cetuximab target the epidermal growth factor receptor for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. These therapies provide a significant survival benefit to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with wild-type RAS. A single point mutation in the ectodomain of EGFR (S468R) confers acquired or secondary resistance in cetuximab treated patients, which is not observed in panitumumab-treated patients. Structural and biophysical studies presented here show this mutation directly blocks cetuximab binding to EGFR domain III and describes a unique mechanism by which panitumumab uses a central cavity to accommodate this mutation.

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<![CDATA[Sequence statistics of tertiary structural motifs reflect protein stability]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5cab0ee8fa60be00a0

The Protein Data Bank (PDB) has been a key resource for learning general rules of sequence-structure relationships in proteins. Quantitative insights have been gained by defining geometric descriptors of structure (e.g., distances, dihedral angles, solvent exposure, etc.) and observing their distributions and sequence preferences. Here we argue that as the PDB continues to grow, it may become unnecessary to reduce structure into a set of elementary descriptors. Instead, it could be possible to deduce quantitative sequence-structure relationships in the context of precisely-defined complex structural motifs by mining the PDB for closely matching backbone geometries. To validate this idea, we turned to the the task of predicting changes in protein stability upon amino-acid substitution—a difficult problem of broad significance. We defined non-contiguous tertiary motifs (TERMs) around a protein site of interest and extracted sequence preferences from ensembles of closely-matching substructures in the PDB to predict mutational stability changes at the site, ΔΔGm. We demonstrate that these ensemble statistics predict ΔΔGm on par with state-of-the-art statistical and machine-learning methods on large thermodynamic datasets, and outperform these, along with a leading structure-based modeling approach, when tested in the context of unbiased diverse mutations. Further, we show that the performance of the TERM-based method is directly related to the amount of available relevant structural data, automatically improving with the growing PDB. This enables a means of estimating prediction accuracy. Our results clearly demonstrate that: 1) statistics of non-contiguous structural motifs in the PDB encode fundamental sequence-structure relationships related to protein thermodynamic stability, and 2) the PDB is now large enough that such statistics are already useful in practice, with their accuracy expected to continue increasing as the database grows. These observations suggest new ways of using structural data towards addressing problems of computational structural biology.

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<![CDATA[The not-so-infinite malleability of RNA viruses: Viral and cellular determinants of RNA virus mutation rates]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5aab0ee8fa60bdf26a ]]>