ResearchPad - t-helper-cells https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Modulation of T helper 1 and T helper 2 immune balance in a murine stress model during <i>Chlamydia muridarum</i> genital infection]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14727 A murine model to study the effect of cold-induced stress (CIS) on Chlamydia muridarum genital infection and immune response has been developed in our laboratory. Previous results in the lab show that CIS increases the intensity of chlamydia genital infection, but little is known about the effects and mechanisms of CIS on the differentiation and activities of CD4+ T cell subpopulations and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). The factors that regulate the production of T helper 1 (Th1) or T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines are not well defined. In this study, we examined whether CIS modulates the expressions of beta-adrenergic receptor (β-AR), transcription factors, hallmark cytokines of Th1 and Th2, and differentiation of BMDCs during C. muridarum genital infection in the murine model. Our results show that the mRNA level of the beta2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) compared to β1-AR and β3-AR was high in the mixed populations of CD4+ T cells and BMDCs. Furthermore, we observed decreased expression of T-bet, low level of Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production, increased expression of GATA-3, and Interleukin-4 (IL-4) production in CD4+ T cells of stressed mice. Exposure of BMDCs to Fenoterol, β2-AR agonist, or ICI118,551, β2-AR antagonist, revealed significant β2-AR stimulation or inhibition, respectively, in stressed mice. Moreover, co-culturing of mature BMDCs and naïve CD4+ T cells increased the production of IL-4, IL-10, L-17, and IL-23 cytokines, suggesting that stimulation of β2-AR leads to the increased production of Th2 cytokines. Overall, our results show for the first time that CIS promotes the switching from a Th1 to Th2 cytokine environment. This was evidenced in the murine stress model by the overexpression of GATA-3 concurrent with elevated IL-4 production, reduced T-bet expression, and IFN-γ secretion.

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<![CDATA[Coincident airway exposure to low-potency allergen and cytomegalovirus sensitizes for allergic airway disease by viral activation of migratory dendritic cells]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c8acc7ed5eed0c48498f892

Despite a broad cell-type tropism, cytomegalovirus (CMV) is an evidentially pulmonary pathogen. Predilection for the lungs is of medical relevance in immunocompromised recipients of hematopoietic cell transplantation, in whom interstitial CMV pneumonia is a frequent and, if left untreated, fatal clinical manifestation of human CMV infection. A conceivable contribution of CMV to airway diseases of other etiology is an issue that so far attracted little medical attention. As the route of primary CMV infection upon host-to-host transmission in early childhood involves airway mucosa, coincidence of CMV airway infection and exposure to airborne environmental antigens is almost unavoidable. For investigating possible consequences of such a coincidence, we established a mouse model of airway co-exposure to CMV and ovalbumin (OVA) representing a protein antigen of an inherently low allergenic potential. Accordingly, intratracheal OVA exposure alone failed to sensitize for allergic airway disease (AAD) upon OVA aerosol challenge. In contrast, airway infection at the time of OVA sensitization predisposed for AAD that was characterized by airway inflammation, IgE secretion, thickening of airway epithelia, and goblet cell hyperplasia. This AAD histopathology was associated with a T helper type 2 (Th2) transcription profile in the lungs, including IL-4, IL-5, IL-9, and IL-25, known inducers of Th2-driven AAD. These symptoms were all prevented by a pre-challenge depletion of CD4+ T cells, but not of CD8+ T cells. As to the underlying mechanism, murine CMV activated migratory CD11b+ as well as CD103+ conventional dendritic cells (cDCs), which have been associated with Th2 cytokine-driven AAD and with antigen cross-presentation, respectively. This resulted in an enhanced OVA uptake and recruitment of the OVA-laden cDCs selectively to the draining tracheal lymph nodes for antigen presentation. We thus propose that CMV, through activation of migratory cDCs in the airway mucosa, can enhance the allergenic potential of otherwise poorly allergenic environmental protein antigens.

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<![CDATA[A secreted schistosome cathepsin B1 cysteine protease and acute schistosome infection induce a transient T helper 17 response]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c4a305fd5eed0c4844bfeae

The natural history of schistosome infection in the mammalian host is determined by CD4+ T helper responses mounted against different parasite life cycle stages. A T helper 2 (TH2) response to schistosome eggs is required for host survival and establishment of chronic infection. However, a TH2 cell-derived cytokine also contributes to an immune milieu that is conducive to schistosome growth and development. Thus, the same responses that allow for host survival have been co-opted by schistosomes to facilitate parasite development and transmission, underscoring the significance of CD4+ T cell responses to both worms and eggs in the natural history of schistosome infection. Here we show that a cathepsin B1 cysteine protease secreted by schistosome worms not only induces TH2 responses, but also TH1 and TH17 responses, by a mechanism that is dependent on the proteolytic activity of the enzyme. Further investigation revealed that, in addition to the expected TH1 and TH2 responses, acute schistosome infection also induces a transient TH17 response that is rapidly down-regulated at the onset of oviposition. TH17 responses are implicated in the development of severe egg-induced pathology. The regulation of worm-induced TH17 responses during acute infection could therefore influence the expression of high and low pathology states as infection progresses.

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<![CDATA[CD4-T cell enumeration in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients: A laboratory performance evaluation of Muse Auto CD4/CD4% system by World Health Organization prequalification of in vitro diagnostics]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5217f3d5eed0c484795bb9

Background

CD4 T-cell counts are still widely used to assess treatment eligibility and follow-up of HIV-infected patients. The World Health Organization (WHO) prequalification of in vitro diagnostics requested a manufacturer independent laboratory evaluation of the analytical performance at the Institute of Tropical Medicine (ITM) Antwerp, Belgium, of the Muse Auto CD4/CD4% system (Millipore), a new small capillary-flow cytometer dedicated to count absolute CD4-T cells and percentages in venous blood samples from HIV-infected patients.

Methods

Two hundred and fifty (250) patients were recruited from the HIV outpatient clinic at ITM. Accuracy and precision of CD4 T cell counting on fresh EDTA anticoagulated venous blood samples were assessed in the laboratory on a Muse Auto CD4/CD4% system. Extensive precision analyses were performed both on fresh blood and on normal and low stabilized whole blood controls. Accuracy ((bias) was assessed by comparing results from Muse CD4/CD4% to the reference (single-platform FACSCalibur). Clinical misclassification was measured at 500, 350, 200 and 100 cells/μL thresholds.

Results

Intra-assay precision was < 5%, and inter-assay was < 9%. CD4 T cell counts measured on Muse Auto CD4/CD4% System and on the reference instrument resulted in regression slopes of 0.97 for absolute counts and 1.03 for CD4 T cell percentages and a correlation coefficient of 0.99 for both. The average absolute bias as compared to the reference was negligible (4 cells/μL or 0.5%). The absolute average bias on CD4 T cell percentages was < 1%. Clinical misclassification at different CD4 T cell thresholds was small resulting in sensitivities and specificities equal or >90% at all thresholds except at 100 cells/μL (sensitivity = 87%). All samples could be analyzed as there was no repetitive rejection errors recorded.

Conclusions

The Muse Auto CD4/CD4% System performed very well on fresh venous blood samples and met all WHO acceptance criteria for analytical performance of CD4 technologies.

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<![CDATA[Strain specific maturation of Dendritic cells and production of IL-1β controls CD40-driven colitis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c605a19d5eed0c4847cc98f

Intestinal integrity is maintained by balanced numbers of CD103+ Dendritic cells (DCs), which generate peripherally induced regulatory T cells (iTregs). We have developed a mouse model where DC-specific constitutive CD40 signals caused a strong reduction of CD103+ DCs in the lamina propria (LP) and intestinal lymph nodes (LN). As a consequence, also iTregs were strongly reduced and transgenic mice on the C57Bl/6-background (B6) developed fatal colitis. Here we describe that transgenic mice on a pure Balb/c-background (B/c) do not show any pathologies, while transgenic C57Bl/6 x Balb/c (F1) mice develop weak colon inflammation, without fatal colitis. This graded pathology correlated with the effects of CD40-signalling on DCs in each background, with striking loss of CD103+ DCs in B6, but reduced in F1 and diminished in B/c background. We further show direct correlation of CD103+ DC-numbers with numbers of iTregs, the frequencies of which behave correspondingly. Striking effects on B6-DCs reflected robust loss of surface MHCII, known to be crucial for iTreg induction. Furthermore, elevated levels of IL-23 together with IL-1, found only in B6 mice, support generation of intestinal IFN-γ+IL-17+ Th17 cells and IFN-γ+ Th1 cells, responsible for onset of disease. Together, this demonstrates a novel aspect of colitis-control, depending on genetic background. Moreover, strain-specific environmental sensing might alter the CD103+ DC/iTreg-axis to tip intestinal homeostatic balance to pathology.

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<![CDATA[Cell-intrinsic regulation of peripheral memory-phenotype T cell frequencies]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c215140d5eed0c4843f956f

Memory T and B lymphocyte numbers are thought to be regulated by recent and cumulative microbial exposures. We report here that memory-phenotype lymphocyte frequencies in B, CD4 and CD8 T-cells in 3-monthly serial bleeds from healthy young adult humans were relatively stable over a 1-year period, while Plasmablast frequencies were not, suggesting that recent environmental exposures affected steady state levels of recently activated but not of memory lymphocyte subsets. Frequencies of memory B and CD4 T cells were not correlated, suggesting that variation in them was unlikely to be determined by cumulative antigenic exposures. Immunophenotyping of adult siblings showed high concordance in memory, but not of recently activated lymphocyte subsets. To explore the possibility of cell-intrinsic regulation of T cell memory, we screened effector memory-phenotype T cell (TEM) frequencies in common independent inbred mice strains. Using two pairs from these strains that differed predominantly in either CD4 TEM and/or CD8 TEM frequencies, we constructed bi-parental bone marrow chimeras in F1 recipient mice, and found that memory T cell frequencies in recipient mice were determined by donor genotypes. Together, these data suggest cell-autonomous determination of memory T niche size, and suggest mechanisms maintaining immune variability.

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<![CDATA[Characteristics of HIV target CD4 T cells collected using different sampling methods from the genital tract of HIV seronegative women]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5cab0ee8fa60be01a0

Background

Understanding the immune profile of CD4 T cells, the primary targets for HIV, in the female genital tract (FGT) is critical for evaluating and developing effective biomedical HIV prevention strategies in women. However, longitudinal investigation of HIV susceptibility markers expressed by FGT CD4 T cells has been hindered by low cellular yield and risk of sampling-associated trauma. We investigated three minimally invasive FGT sampling methods to characterize and compare CD4 T cell yield and phenotype with the goal of establishing feasible sampling strategies for immune profiling of mucosal CD4 T cells.

Methods and results

FGT samples were collected bimonthly from 12 healthy HIV negative women of reproductive age in the following order: 1) Cervicovaginal lavage (CVL), 2) two sequential endocervical flocked swabs (FS), and 3) two sequential endocervical cytobrushes (CB1, CB2). Cells were isolated and phentoyped via flow cytometry. CD4 T cell recovery was highest from each individual CB compared to either CVL or FS (p < 0.0001). The majority of CD4 T cells within the FGT, regardless of sampling method, expressed CCR5 relative to peripheral blood (p < 0.01). Within the CB, CCR5+ CD4 T cells expressed significantly higher levels of α4β7, CD69, and low levels of CD27 relative to CCR5- CD4 T cells (all p < 0.001). We also identified CD4 Treg lineage cells expressing CCR5 among CB samples.

Conclusions

Using three different mucosal sampling methods collected longitudinally we demonstrate that CD4 T cells within the FGT express CCR5 and α4β7 and are highly activated, attributes which could act in concert to facilitate HIV acquisition. FS and CB sampling methods can allow for investigation of strategies to reduce HIV target cells in the FGT and could inform the design and interpretation microbicide and vaccine studies in women.

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<![CDATA[Low Mutation Burden in Ovarian Cancer May Limit the Utility of Neoantigen-Targeted Vaccines]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9f2ab0ee8fa60b6eefd

Due to advances in sequencing technology, somatically mutated cancer antigens, or neoantigens, are now readily identifiable and have become compelling targets for immunotherapy. In particular, neoantigen-targeted vaccines have shown promise in several pre-clinical and clinical studies. However, to date, neoantigen-targeted vaccine studies have involved tumors with exceptionally high mutation burdens. It remains unclear whether neoantigen-targeted vaccines will be broadly applicable to cancers with intermediate to low mutation burdens, such as ovarian cancer. To address this, we assessed whether a derivative of the murine ovarian tumor model ID8 could be targeted with neoantigen vaccines. We performed whole exome and transcriptome sequencing on ID8-G7 cells. We identified 92 somatic mutations, 39 of which were transcribed, missense mutations. For the 17 top predicted MHC class I binding mutations, we immunized mice subcutaneously with synthetic long peptide vaccines encoding the relevant mutation. Seven of 17 vaccines induced robust mutation-specific CD4 and/or CD8 T cell responses. However, none of the vaccines prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice in either the prophylactic or therapeutic setting. Moreover, none of the neoantigen-specific T cell lines recognized ID8-G7 tumor cells in vitro, indicating that the corresponding mutations did not give rise to bonafide MHC-presented epitopes. Additionally, bioinformatic analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas data revealed that only 12% (26/220) of HGSC cases had a ≥90% likelihood of harboring at least one authentic, naturally processed and presented neoantigen versus 51% (80/158) of lung cancers. Our findings highlight the limitations of applying neoantigen-targeted vaccines to tumor types with intermediate/low mutation burdens.

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<![CDATA[Transcriptomic Analysis Implicates the p53 Signaling Pathway in the Establishment of HIV-1 Latency in Central Memory CD4 T Cells in an In Vitro Model]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da48ab0ee8fa60b8c3e4

The search for an HIV-1 cure has been greatly hindered by the presence of a viral reservoir that persists despite antiretroviral therapy (ART). Studies of HIV-1 latency in vivo are also complicated by the low proportion of latently infected cells in HIV-1 infected individuals. A number of models of HIV-1 latency have been developed to examine the signaling pathways and viral determinants of latency and reactivation. A primary cell model of HIV-1 latency, which incorporates the generation of primary central memory CD4 T cells (TCM), full-length virus infection (HIVNL4-3) and ART to suppress virus replication, was used to investigate the establishment of HIV latency using RNA-Seq. Initially, an investigation of host and viral gene expression in the resting and activated states of this model indicated that the resting condition was reflective of a latent state. Then, a comparison of the host transcriptome between the uninfected and latently infected conditions of this model identified 826 differentially expressed genes, many of which were related to p53 signaling. Inhibition of the transcriptional activity of p53 by pifithrin-α during HIV-1 infection reduced the ability of HIV-1 to be reactivated from its latent state by an unknown mechanism. In conclusion, this model may be used to screen latency reversing agents utilized in shock and kill approaches to cure HIV, to search for cellular markers of latency, and to understand the mechanisms by which HIV-1 establishes latency.

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<![CDATA[MAIT cells are reduced in frequency and functionally impaired in human T lymphotropic virus type 1 infection: Potential clinical implications]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db51ab0ee8fa60bdc449

HTLV-1 infection is associated with several inflammatory disorders, including the neurodegenerative condition HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). It is unclear why a minority of infected subjects develop HAM/TSP. The cellular immune response has been implicated in the development of inflammatory alterations in these patients; however the pathogenic mechanisms for disease progression remain unclear. Furthermore, HTLV-1-infected individuals have an increase incidence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, suggesting that immunological defect are associated with HTLV-1 infection. Evidence suggests an important role for Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in the early control of Mtb infection. Chronic viral infections like HIV and HCV have been associated with decreased frequency and functionality of MAIT cells. We hypothesized that HTLV-1 infection is associated with similar perturbations in MAIT cells. We investigated MAIT cell frequency, phenotype, and function by flow cytometry in a cohort of 10 asymptomatic and 10 HAM/TSP HTLV-1 infected patients. We found that MAIT cells from HTLV-1-infected subjects were reduced and showed high co-expression of the activation markers CD38 and HLA-DR but normal levels of CCR6 and CD127. MAIT cells had a lower expression of the transcription factor PLZF in HAM/TSP patients. Unlike Tax-specific CD8+T cells, which are hyperfunctional, MAIT cells from HTLV-1-infected subjects had a poor IFNγ response following antigen stimulation. MAIT cell perturbations in HTLV-1 infection were not associated with HTLV-1 proviral load and MAIT cells were not infected by HTLV-1 in vivo. Rather, MAIT cells loss was associated with immune activation. Overall, our results do not support a role for MAIT cells in HAM/TSP pathogenesis but reduced numbers of MAIT cells, together with their poor functionality, could contribute to the increased susceptibility of HTLV-1-infected individuals to other infectious agents.

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<![CDATA[Modeling Granulomas in Response to Infection in the Lung]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db09ab0ee8fa60bc97ba

Alveolar macrophages play a large role in the innate immune response of the lung. However, when these highly immune-regulatory cells are unable to eradicate pathogens, the adaptive immune system, which includes activated macrophages and lymphocytes, particularly T cells, is called upon to control the pathogens. This collection of immune cells surrounds, isolates and quarantines the pathogen, forming a small tissue structure called a granuloma for intracellular pathogens like Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In the present work we develop a mathematical model of the dynamics of a granuloma by a system of partial differential equations. The ‘strength’ of the adaptive immune response to infection in the lung is represented by a parameter α, the flux rate by which T cells and M1 macrophages that immigrated from the lymph nodes enter into the granuloma through its boundary. The parameter α is negatively correlated with the ‘switching time’, namely, the time it takes for the number of M1 type macrophages to surpass the number of infected, M2 type alveolar macrophages. Simulations of the model show that as α increases the radius of the granuloma and bacterial load in the granuloma both decrease. The model is used to determine the efficacy of potential host-directed therapies in terms of the parameter α, suggesting that, with fixed dosing level, an infected individual with a stronger immune response will receive greater benefits in terms of reducing the bacterial load.

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<![CDATA[Brugia malayi Antigen (BmA) Inhibits HIV-1 Trans-Infection but Neither BmA nor ES-62 Alter HIV-1 Infectivity of DC Induced CD4+ Th-Cells]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989daf6ab0ee8fa60bc2d82

One of the hallmarks of HIV-1 disease is the association of heightened CD4+ T-cell activation with HIV-1 replication. Parasitic helminths including filarial nematodes have evolved numerous and complex mechanisms to skew, dampen and evade human immune responses suggesting that HIV-1 infection may be modulated in co-infected individuals. Here we studied the effects of two filarial nematode products, adult worm antigen from Brugia malayi (BmA) and excretory-secretory product 62 (ES-62) from Acanthocheilonema viteae on HIV-1 infection in vitro. Neither BmA nor ES-62 influenced HIV-1 replication in CD4+ enriched T-cells, with either a CCR5- or CXCR4-using virus. BmA, but not ES-62, had the capacity to bind the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) thereby inhibiting HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ enriched T-cells. As for their effect on DCs, neither BmA nor ES-62 could enhance or inhibit DC maturation as determined by CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR expression, or the production of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α. As expected, due to the unaltered DC phenotype, no differences were found in CD4+ T helper (Th) cell phenotypes induced by DCs treated with either BmA or ES-62. Moreover, the HIV-1 susceptibility of the Th-cell populations induced by BmA or ES-62 exposed DCs was unaffected for both CCR5- and CXCR4-using HIV-1 viruses. In conclusion, although BmA has the potential capacity to interfere with HIV-1 transmission or initial viral dissemination through preventing the virus from interacting with DCs, no differences in the Th-cell polarizing capacity of DCs exposed to BmA or ES-62 were observed. Neither antigenic source demonstrated beneficial or detrimental effects on the HIV-1 susceptibility of CD4+ Th-cells induced by exposed DCs.

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<![CDATA[Defective T Memory Cell Differentiation after Varicella Zoster Vaccination in Older Individuals]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dac8ab0ee8fa60bb31c9

Vaccination with attenuated live varicella zoster virus (VZV) can prevent zoster reactivation, but protection is incomplete especially in an older population. To decipher the molecular mechanisms underlying variable vaccine responses, T- and B-cell responses to VZV vaccination were examined in individuals of different ages including identical twin pairs. Contrary to the induction of VZV-specific antibodies, antigen-specific T cell responses were significantly influenced by inherited factors. Diminished generation of long-lived memory T cells in older individuals was mainly caused by increased T cell loss after the peak response while the expansion of antigen-specific T cells was not affected by age. Gene expression in activated CD4 T cells at the time of the peak response identified gene modules related to cell cycle regulation and DNA repair that correlated with the contraction phase of the T cell response and consequently the generation of long-lived memory cells. These data identify cell cycle regulatory mechanisms as targets to reduce T cell attrition in a vaccine response and to improve the generation of antigen-specific T cell memory, in particular in an older population.

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<![CDATA[Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Enhance CD4 T Cell Susceptibility to NK Cell Killing but Reduce NK Cell Function]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dae9ab0ee8fa60bbe995

In the search for a cure for HIV-1 infection, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are being investigated as activators of latently infected CD4 T cells to promote their targeting by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL). However, HDACi may also inhibit CTL function, suggesting different immunotherapy approaches may need to be explored. Here, we study the impact of different HDACi on both Natural Killer (NK) and CTL targeting of HIV-1 infected cells. We found HDACi down-regulated HLA class I expression independently of HIV-1 Nef which, without significantly compromising CTL function, led to enhanced targeting by NK cells. HDACi-treated HIV-1-infected CD4 T cells were also more effectively cleared than untreated controls during NK co-culture. However, HDACi impaired NK function, reducing degranulation and killing capacity. Depending on the HDACi and dose, this impairment could counteract the benefit gained by treating infected target cells. These data suggest that following HDACi-induced HLA class I down-regulation NK cells kill HIV-1-infected cells, although HDACi-mediated NK cell inhibition may negate this effect. Our data emphasize the importance of studying the effects of potential interventions on both targets and effectors.

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<![CDATA[Dendritic Cell-Like Cells Accumulate in Regenerating Murine Skeletal Muscle after Injury and Boost Adaptive Immune Responses Only upon a Microbial Challenge]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989daefab0ee8fa60bc08f5

Skeletal muscle injury causes a local sterile inflammatory response. In parallel, a state of immunosuppression develops distal to the site of tissue damage. Granulocytes and monocytes that are rapidly recruited to the site of injury contribute to tissue regeneration. In this study we used a mouse model of traumatic skeletal muscle injury to investigate the previously unknown role of dendritic cells (DCs) that accumulate in injured tissue. We injected the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) into the skeletal muscle of injured or sham-treated mice to address the ability of these DCs in antigen uptake, migration, and specific T cell activation in the draining popliteal lymph node (pLN). Immature DC-like cells appeared in the skeletal muscle by 4 days after injury and subsequently acquired a mature phenotype, as indicated by increased expression of the costimulatory molecules CD40 and CD86. After the injection of OVA into the muscle, OVA-loaded DCs migrated into the pLN. The migration of DC-like cells from the injured muscle was enhanced in the presence of the microbial stimulus lipopolysaccharide at the site of antigen uptake and triggered an increased OVA-specific T helper cell type 1 (Th1) response in the pLN. Naïve OVA-loaded DCs were superior in Th1-like priming in the pLN when adoptively transferred into the skeletal muscle of injured mice, a finding indicating the relevance of the microenvironment in the regenerating skeletal muscle for increased Th1-like priming. These findings suggest that DC-like cells that accumulate in the regenerating muscle initiate a protective immune response upon microbial challenge and thereby overcome injury-induced immunosuppression.

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<![CDATA[Increasing procaspase 8 expression using repurposed drugs to induce HIV infected cell death in ex vivo patient cells]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5fab0ee8fa60be1134

HIV persists because a reservoir of latently infected CD4 T cells do not express viral proteins and are indistinguishable from uninfected cells. One approach to HIV cure suggests that reactivating HIV will activate cytotoxic pathways; yet when tested in vivo, reactivating cells do not die sufficiently to reduce cell-associated HIV DNA levels. We recently showed that following reactivation from latency, HIV infected cells generate the HIV specific cytotoxic protein Casp8p41 which is produced by HIV protease cleaving procaspase 8. However, cell death is prevented, possibly due to low procaspase 8 expression. Here, we tested whether increasing procaspase 8 levels in CD4 T cells will produce more Casp8p41 following HIV reactivation, causing more reactivated cells to die. Screening 1277 FDA approved drugs identified 168 that increased procaspase 8 expression by at least 1.7-fold. Of these 30 were tested for anti-HIV effects in an acute HIVIIIb infection model, and 9 drugs at physiologic relevant levels significantly reduced cell-associated HIV DNA. Primary CD4 T cells from ART suppressed HIV patients were treated with one of these 9 drugs and reactivated with αCD3/αCD28. Four drugs significantly increased Casp8p41 levels following HIV reactivation, and decreased total cell associated HIV DNA levels (flurbiprofen: p = 0.014; doxycycline: p = 0.044; indomethacin: p = 0.025; bezafibrate: P = 0.018) without effecting the viability of uninfected cells. Thus procaspase 8 levels can be increased pharmacologically and, in the context of HIV reactivation, increase Casp8p41 causing death of reactivating cells and decreased HIV DNA levels. Future studies will be required to define the clinical utility of this or similar approaches.

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<![CDATA[Decreased Frequencies of Circulating Follicular Helper T Cell Counterparts and Plasmablasts in Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients Naïve for TNF Blockers]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da3bab0ee8fa60b881e8

Follicular helper T cells (Tfh), localized in lymphoid organs, promote B cell differentiation and function. Circulating CD4 T cells expressing CXCR5, ICOS and/or PD-1 are counterparts of Tfh. Three subpopulations of circulating CD4+CXCR5+ cells have been described: CXCR3+CCR6- (Tfh-Th1), CXCR3-CCR6+ (Tfh-Th17), and CXCR3-CCR6- (Tfh-Th2). Only Tfh-Th17 and Tfh-Th2 function as B cell helpers. Our objective was to study the frequencies of circulating Tfh (cTfh), cTfh subsets and plasmablasts (CD19+CD20-CD27+CD38high cells), and the function of cTfh cells, in patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS). To this end, peripheral blood was drawn from healthy controls (HC) (n = 50), AS patients naïve for TNF blockers (AS/nb) (n = 25) and AS patients treated with TNF blockers (AS/b) (n = 25). The frequencies of cTfh and plasmablasts were determined by flow cytometry. Cocultures of magnetically sorted CD4+CXCR5+ T cells with autologous CD19+CD27- naïve B cells were established from 3 AS/nb patients and 3 HC, and concentrations of IgG, A and M were measured in supernatants. We obseved that AS/nb but not AS/b patients, demonstrated decreased frequencies of circulating CD4+CXCR5+ICOS+PD-1+ cells and plasmablasts, together with a decreased (Tfh-Th17+Tfh-Th2)/Tfh-Th1 ratio. The amounts of IgG and IgA produced in cocultures of CD4+CXCR5+ T cells with CD19+CD27- B cells of AS/nb patients were significantly lower than observed in cocultures established from HC. In summary, AS/nb but not AS/b patients, demonstrate a decreased frequency of cTfh and plasmablasts, and an underrepresentation of cTfh subsets bearing a B helper phenotype. In addition, peripheral blood CD4+CXCR5+ T cells of AS/nb patients showed a decreased capacity to help B cells ex vivo.

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<![CDATA[HIV-Infected Children Have Lower Frequencies of CD8+ Mucosal-Associated Invariant T (MAIT) Cells that Correlate with Innate, Th17 and Th22 Cell Subsets]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da2eab0ee8fa60b83768

Mucosal-associated invariant T cells (MAIT) are innate T cells restricted by major histocompatibility related molecule 1 (MR1) presenting riboflavin metabolite ligands derived from microbes. Specificity to riboflavin metabolites confers MAIT cells a broad array of host-protective activity against gram-negative and -positive bacteria, mycobacteria, and fungal pathogens. MAIT cells are present at low levels in the peripheral blood of neonates and gradually expand to relatively abundant levels during childhood. Despite no anti-viral activity, MAIT cells are depleted early and irreversibly in HIV infected adults. Such loss or impaired expansion of MAIT cells in HIV-positive children may render them more susceptible to common childhood illnesses and opportunistic infections. In this study we evaluated the frequency of MAIT cells in perinatally HIV-infected children, their response to antiretroviral treatment and their associations with HIV clinical status and related innate and adaptive immune cell subsets with potent antibacterial effector functions. We found HIV+ children between ages 3 to 18 years have significantly decreased CD8+ MAIT cell frequencies compared to uninfected healthy children. Remarkably, CD8 MAIT levels gradually increased with antiretroviral therapy, with greater recovery when treatment is initiated at a young age. Moreover, diminished CD8+ MAIT cell frequencies are associated with low CD4:CD8 ratios and elevated sCD14, suggesting a link with HIV disease progression. Last, CD8+ MAIT cell levels tightly correlate with other antibacterial and mucosa-protective immune subsets, namely, neutrophils, innate-like T cells, and Th17 and Th22 cells. Together these findings suggest that low frequencies of MAIT cells in HIV positive children are part of a concerted disruption to the innate and adaptive immune compartments specialized in sensing and responding to pathogenic or commensal bacteria.

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<![CDATA[Characteristics of Allergic Pulmonary Inflammation in CXCR3Knockout Mice Sensitized and Challenged with House Dust Mite Protein]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db38ab0ee8fa60bd3b27

Chemokine C-X-C motif receptor 3 (CXCR3) is a chemokine receptor that is mainly expressed by activated T lymphocytes. T cells play important roles in allergic pulmonary inflammation, which is a hallmark of asthma and elicits the localized accumulation of activated T cells in the lung. In China, a marked increase in the incidence rate of chronic allergic pulmonary inflammation has made it a major public health threat. In the present study, we investigated the role of CXCR3 and its ligands in airway inflammation induced by house dust mite protein (HDMP) in a CXCR3 knockout (CXCR3KO) asthma mouse model. Pathological manifestations in the lung, cell counts and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) classifications were studied using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. The levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ in the BALF and splenocyte supernatants were measured using ELISA. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the lung and spleen were analyzed by flow cytometry. RT-PCR was applied to measure the mRNA transcript levels of monokines induced by IFN-γ(CXCL9) and IFN-γ inducible protein 10(CXCL10). The total cell counts, eosinophil counts, and IL-4 levels in the BALF and cultured splenocyte supernatants were significantly increased, while the levels of IFN-γ were reduced in the HDMP groups(P<0.01). Changes in the total cell counts, eosinophil counts, and lymphocyte counts, as well as the total protein levels in the BALF, the levels of IL-4 in splenocyte supernatants, and the pathological manifestations in the lung, were all greater in CXCR3KO mice than in C57BL/6 wild-type mice. Furthermore, the expression levels of CXCL9 and CXCL10 mRNA transcripts in the lungs of CXCR3KO mice were lower than those in C57BL/6 wild-type mice (P<0.05). CXCR3 and its ligands (i.e., CXCL9 and CXCL10) may play anti-inflammatory roles in this animal model. Promoting the expression of CXCR3 and its ligands may represent a novel therapeutic approach for preventing and curing asthma.

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<![CDATA[CD4+ T Cells Recognizing PE/PPE Antigens Directly or via Cross Reactivity Are Protective against Pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dad0ab0ee8fa60bb5f57

Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), possesses at least three type VII secretion systems, ESX-1, -3 and -5 that are actively involved in pathogenesis and host-pathogen interaction. We recently showed that an attenuated Mtb vaccine candidate (Mtb Δppe25-pe19), which lacks the characteristic ESX-5-associated pe/ppe genes, but harbors all other components of the ESX-5 system, induces CD4+ T-cell immune responses against non-esx-5-associated PE/PPE protein homologs. These T cells strongly cross-recognize the missing esx-5-associated PE/PPE proteins. Here, we characterized the fine composition of the functional cross-reactive Th1 effector subsets specific to the shared PE/PPE epitopes in mice immunized with the Mtb Δppe25-pe19 vaccine candidate. We provide evidence that the Mtb Δppe25-pe19 strain, despite its significant attenuation, is comparable to the WT Mtb strain with regard to: (i) its antigenic repertoire related to the different ESX systems, (ii) the induced Th1 effector subset composition, (iii) the differentiation status of the Th1 cells induced, and (iv) its particular features at stimulating the innate immune response. Indeed, we found significant contribution of PE/PPE-specific Th1 effector cells in the protective immunity against pulmonary Mtb infection. These results offer detailed insights into the immune mechanisms underlying the remarkable protective efficacy of the live attenuated Mtb Δppe25-pe19 vaccine candidate, as well as the specific potential of PE/PPE proteins as protective immunogens.

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