ResearchPad - tachycardia https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Model based estimation of QT intervals in non-invasive fetal ECG signals]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7659 The end timing of T waves in fetal electrocardiogram (fECG) is important for the evaluation of ST and QT intervals which are vital markers to assess cardiac repolarization patterns. Monitoring malignant fetal arrhythmias in utero is fundamental to care in congenital heart anomalies preventing perinatal death. Currently, reliable detection of end of T waves is possible only by using fetal scalp ECG (fsECG) and fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG). fMCG is expensive and less accessible and fsECG is an invasive technique available only during intrapartum period. Another safer and affordable alternative is the non-invasive fECG (nfECG) which can provide similar assessment provided by fsECG and fMECG but with less accuracy (not beat by beat). Detection of T waves using nfECG is challenging because of their low amplitudes and high noise. In this study, a novel model-based method that estimates the end of T waves in nfECG signals is proposed. The repolarization phase has been modeled as the discharging phase of a capacitor. To test the model, fECG signals were collected from 58 pregnant women (age: (34 ± 6) years old) bearing normal and abnormal fetuses with gestational age (GA) 20-41 weeks. QT and QTc intervals have been calculated to test the level of agreement between the model-based and reference values (fsECG and Doppler Ultrasound (DUS) signals) in normal subjects. The results of the test showed high agreement between model-based and reference values (difference < 5%), which implies that the proposed model could be an alternative method to detect the end of T waves in nfECG signals.

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<![CDATA[Isolated diastolic potentials as predictors of success in ablation of right ventricular outflow tract idiopathic premature ventricular contractions]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c648cdbd5eed0c484c8196e

Background and aims

Discrete potentials, low voltage and fragmented electrograms, have been previously reported at ablation site, in patients with premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) originating in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT). The aim of this study was to review the electrograms at ablation site and assess the presence of diastolic potentials and their association with success.

Methods

We retrospectively reviewed the electrograms obtained at the radiofrequency (RF) delivery sites of 48 patients subjected to ablation of RVOT frequent PVCs. We assessed the duration and amplitude of local electrogram, local activation time, and presence of diastolic potentials and fragmented electrograms.

Results

We reviewed 134 electrograms, median 2 (1–4) per patient. Success was achieved in 40 patients (83%). At successful sites the local activation time was earlier– 54 (-35 to -77) ms vs -26 (-12 to -35) ms, p<0.0001; the local electrogram had lower amplitude 1 (0.45–1.15) vs 1.5 (0.5–2.1) mV, p = 0.006, and longer duration 106 (80–154) vs 74 (60–90) ms, p<0.0001. Diastolic potentials and fragmented electrograms were more frequently present, respectively 76% vs 9%, p <0.0001 and 54% vs 11%, p<0.0001. In univariable analysis these variables were all associated with success. In multivariable analysis only the presence of diastolic potentials [OR 15.5 (95% CI: 3.92–61.2; p<0.0001)], and the value of local activation time [OR 1.11 (95% CI: 1.049–1.172 p<0.0001)], were significantly associated with success.

Conclusion

In this group of patients the presence of diastolic potentials at the ablation site was associated with success.

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<![CDATA[Simulation of Daily Snapshot Rhythm Monitoring to Identify Atrial Fibrillation in Continuously Monitored Patients with Stroke Risk Factors]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dacfab0ee8fa60bb57f6

Background

New technologies are diffusing into medical practice swiftly. Hand-held devices such as smartphones can record short-duration (e.g., 1-minute) ECGs, but their effectiveness in identifying patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) is unknown.

Methods

We used data from the TRENDS study, which included 370 patients (mean age 71 years, 71% men, CHADS2 score≥1 point: mean 2.3 points) who had no documentation of atrial tachycardia (AT)/AF or antiarrhythmic or anticoagulant drug use at baseline. All were subsequently newly diagnosed with AT/AF by a cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) over one year of follow-up. Using a computer simulation approach (5,000 repetitions), we estimated the detection rate for paroxysmal AT/AF via daily snapshot ECG monitoring over various periods, with the probability of detection equal to the percent AT/AF burden on each day.

Results

The estimated AT/AF detection rates with snapshot monitoring periods of 14, 28, 56, 112, and 365 days were 10%, 15%, 21%, 28%, and 50% respectively. The detection rate over 365 days of monitoring was higher in those with CHADS2 scores ≥2 than in those with CHADS2 scores of 1 (53% vs. 38%), and was higher in those with AT/AF burden ≥0.044 hours/day compared to those with AT/AF burden <0.044 hours/day (91% vs. 14%; both P<0.05).

Conclusions

Daily snapshot ECG monitoring over 365 days detects half of patients who developed AT/AF as detected by CIED, and shorter intervals of monitoring detected fewer AT/AF patients. The detection rate was associated with individual CHADS2 score and AT/AF burden.

Trial Registration

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00279981

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<![CDATA[Inhibition of Cardiac Kir Current (IK1) by Protein Kinase C Critically Depends on PKCβ and Kir2.2]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db4bab0ee8fa60bda490

Background

Cardiac inwardly rectifying Kir current (IK1) mediates terminal repolarisation and is critical for the stabilization of the diastolic membrane potential. Its predominant molecular basis in mammalian ventricle is heterotetrameric assembly of Kir2.1 and Kir2.2 channel subunits. It has been shown that PKC inhibition of IK1 promotes focal ventricular ectopy. However, the underlying molecular mechanism has not been fully elucidated to date.

Methods and Results

In the Xenopus oocyte expression system, we observed a pronounced PKC-induced inhibition of Kir2.2 but not Kir2.1 currents. The PKC regulation of Kir2.2 could be reproduced by an activator of conventional PKC isoforms and antagonized by pharmacological inhibition of PKCβ. In isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes (rat, mouse), pharmacological activation of conventional PKC isoforms induced a pronounced inhibition of IK1. The PKC effect in rat ventricular cardiomyocytes was markedly attenuated following co-application of a small molecule inhibitor of PKCβ. Underlining the critical role of PKCβ, the PKC-induced inhibition of IK1 was absent in homozygous PKCβ knockout-mice. After heterologous expression of Kir2.1-Kir2.2 concatemers in Xenopus oocytes, heteromeric Kir2.1/Kir2.2 currents were also inhibited following activation of PKC.

Conclusion

We conclude that inhibition of cardiac IK1 by PKC critically depends on the PKCβ isoform and Kir2.2 subunits. This regulation represents a potential novel target for the antiarrhythmic therapy of focal ventricular arrhythmias.

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<![CDATA[Atrial Substrate Modification in Atrial Fibrillation: Targeting GP or CFAE? Evidence from Meta-Analysis of Clinical Trials]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dae5ab0ee8fa60bbd114

Several clinically relevant outcomes post atrial substrate modification in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) have not been systematically analyzed among published studies on adjunctive cardiac ganglionated plexi (GP) or complex fractionated atrial electograms (CFAE) ablation vs. pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) alone. Out of 176 reports identified, the present meta-analysis included 14 randomized and non-randomized controlled trials (1613 patients) meeting inclusion criteria. Addition of GP ablation to PVI significantly increased freedom from atrial tachyarrhythmia in short- (OR: 1.72; P = 0.003) and long-term (OR: 2.0, P = 0.0006) follow-up, while adjunctive CFAE ablation did not after one or repeat procedure (P<0.05). The percentage of atrial tachycardia or atrial flutter (AT/AFL) after one procedure was higher for CFAE than GP ablation. In sub-analysis of non-paroxysmal AF, relative to PVI alone, adjunctive GP but not CFAE ablation significantly increased sinus rhythm maintenance (OR: 1.88, P = 0.01; and OR:1.24, P = 0.18, respectively). Meta regression analysis of the 14 studies indicated that sample size was significant source of heterogeneity either in outcomes after one or repeat procedure. In conclusion, in patients with AF, adjunctive GP but not CFAE ablation appeared to significantly add to the beneficial effects on sinus rhythm maintenance of PVI ablation alone; and CFAE ablation was associated with higher incidence of subsequent AT/AFL.

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<![CDATA[T-wave loop area from a pre-implant 12-lead ECG is associated with appropriate ICD shocks]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db50ab0ee8fa60bdbf0f

Aims

In implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) patients, predictors of ICD shocks and mortality are needed to improve patient selection. Electrocardiographic (ECG) markers are simple to obtain and have been demonstrated to predict mortality. We aimed to assess the association of T-wave loop area and circularity with ICD shocks.

Methods

The study investigated patients with ICDs implanted between 1998 and 2010 for whom digital 12-lead ECGs (Schiller CS200 ECG-Network) of sufficient quality were obtained within 1 month prior to the implantation. T-wave loop area and circularity were calculated. Follow-up data of appropriate shocks were obtained during ICD clinic visits that included reviews of device stored electrograms.

Results

A total of 605 patients (82% males) were included; 68% had ischemic cardiomyopathy and 72% were treated for primary prevention. Over 3.8±1.4 years of follow-up, 114 patients (19%) experienced appropriate shock(s). Those with smaller T-wave loop area received fewer shocks (TLA, hazard ratio, HR, per increase of 1 technical unit, 0.71; [95% confidence interval, 0.53–0.94]; P = 0.02) and those with larger T-wave loop circularity (TLC) representing rounder T wave loop received more shocks (HR per 1% TLC increase 2.96; [0.85–10.36]; P = 0.09). When the quartile containing the largest TLA and TLC values, respectively, were compared to the remaining cases, TLA remained significantly associated with fewer and TLC with more frequent shocks also after multivariate adjustment for clinical variables (HR, 0.59 [0.35–0.99], P = 0.044; and 1.64 [1.08–2.49], P = 0.021, respectively).

Conclusions

The size and shape of the T-wave loop calculated from pre-implantation 12-lead ECGs are associated with appropriate ICD shocks.

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<![CDATA[Impaired Cerebral Autoregulation during Head Up Tilt in Patients with Severe Brain Injury]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dae9ab0ee8fa60bbe648

Early mobilization is of importance for improving long-term outcome for patients after severe acquired brain injury. A limiting factor for early mobilization by head-up tilt is orthostatic intolerance. The purpose of the present study was to examine cerebral autoregulation in patients with severe acquired brain injury and a low level of consciousness. Fourteen patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance and fifteen healthy volunteers were enrolled. Blood pressure was evaluated by pulse contour analysis, heart rate and RR-intervals were determined by electrocardiography, middle cerebral artery velocity was evaluated by transcranial Doppler, and near-infrared spectroscopy determined frontal lobe oxygenation in the supine position and during head-up tilt. Cerebral autoregulation was evaluated as the mean flow index calculated as the ratio between middle cerebral artery mean velocity and estimated cerebral perfusion pressure. Patients with acquired brain injury presented an increase in mean flow index during head-up tilt indicating impaired autoregulation (P < 0.001). Spectral analysis of heart rate variability in the frequency domain revealed lower magnitudes of ~0.1 Hz spectral power in patients compared to healthy controls suggesting baroreflex dysfunction. In conclusion, patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance during head-up tilt have impaired cerebral autoregulation more than one month after brain injury.

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<![CDATA[Long-Term Outcome of Non-Sustained Ventricular Tachycardia in Structurally Normal Hearts]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da99ab0ee8fa60ba2eb2

Background

The impact of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT) on the risk of thromboembolic event and clinical outcomes in patients without structural heart disease remains undetermined. This study aimed to evaluate the association between NSVT and clinical outcomes.

Methods

The study population of 5903 patients was culled from the “Registry of 24-hour ECG monitoring at Taipei Veterans General Hospital” (REMOTE database) between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2004. Of that total, we enrolled 3767 patients without sustained ventricular tachycardia, structural heart disease, and permanent pacemaker. For purposes of this study, NSVT was defined as 3 or more consecutive beats arising below the atrioventricular node with an RR interval of <600 ms (>100 beats/min) and lasting < 30 seconds.

Result

There were 776 deaths, 2042 hospitalizations for any reason, 638 cardiovascular (CV)-related hospitalizations, 350 ischemic strokes, 409 transient ischemic accident (TIA), 368 new-onset heart failure (HF), and 260 new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) with a mean follow-up duration of 10 ± 1 years. In multivariate analysis, the presence of NSVT was independently associated with death (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.362, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.071–1.731), CV hospitalization (HR: 1.527, 95% CI: 1.171–1.992), ischemic stroke (HR: 1.436, 95% CI: 1.014–2.032), TIA (HR 1.483, 95% CI: 1.069–2.057), and new-onset HF (HR: 1.716, 95% CI: 1.243–2.368). There was no significant association between the presence of NSVT and all-cause hospitalization or new-onset AF.

Conclusion

In patients without structural heart disease, presence of NSVT on 24-hour monitoring was independently associated with death, CV hospitalization, ischemic stroke, TIA, and new onset heart failure.

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<![CDATA[Atrial Fibrillation in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Is the Extent of Septal Hypertrophy Important?]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da68ab0ee8fa60b92511

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a cardiac disease associated with a high incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF). Recent studies have suggested that interventricular septum thickness may influence the risk stratification of patients with AF. We evaluated the effects of septal hypertrophy on morbidity and mortality in patients with HCM. Patients were followed for a median of 6.1 years and were divided into two groups according to the extent of septal hypertrophy. A total of 1,360 HCM patients were enrolled: 482 (33%) apical or apicoseptal, 415 (28%) asymmetric septal, 388 (27%) basal septal, 38 (2.6%) concentric, and 37 (2.5%) diffuse and mixed type. Ninety-two all-cause deaths and 21 cardiac deaths occurred. The total event rates were significantly higher for patients with HCM with more extensive septal hypertrophy (group A) compared to those with HCM ± focal septal hypertrophy (group B), regardless of type (p<0.001). Arrhythmias occurred in 502 patients, with a significantly higher incidence in group A than in group B (p<0.001). Among patients with arrhythmias, the incidence of AF was significantly higher in group A than group B (p<0.001). In univariate Cox analysis, a greater extent of septal hypertrophy (p<0.001), E/E´ ratio (p = 0.011), and mitral regurgitation grade (p = 0.003) were significantly associated with developing AF. In multivariate Cox analyses, a greater extent of septal hypertrophy [odds ratio (OR) 5.44 (2.29–12.92), p<0.001] in patients with HCM was significantly associated with developing AF. In conclusion, a greater extent of septal hypertrophy is an independent predictor of progression to AF in patients with HCM.

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<![CDATA[Low-Level Carotid Baroreceptor Stimulation Suppresses Ventricular Arrhythmias during Acute Ischemia]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db3cab0ee8fa60bd5144

Background

The autonomic imbalance during acute ischemia is involved in the occurrence of life-threatening arrhythmias.

Objective

To investigate the effect of autonomic nervous system (ANS) modulation by low-level carotid baroreceptor stimulation (LL-CBS) on ventricular ischemia arrhythmias.

Methods

Anesthetized dogs were received either sham treatment (SHAM group, n = 10) or LL-CBS treatment (LL-CBS group, n = 10). The voltage lowering the blood pressure was used as the threshold for setting LL-CBS at 80% below the threshold. Treatment started 1 hour before left anterior descending coronary (LAD) occlusion, and continued until the end of experience. Ventricular effective refractory periods (ERP), monophasic action potential duration at 90% (APD90), ventricular arrhythmias, indices of heart rate variability, left stellate ganglion nerve activity (LSGNA) and infarct sizes were measured and analyzed.

Results

Ventricular ischemia resulted in an acute reduction of blood pressure, which was not significantly affected by LL-CBS. After 1 hour of LL-CBS, there was a progressive and significant increase in ERP, increase in APD90, and decrease in LSGNA vs the SHAM group (all P<0.05). LL-CBS apparently reduced premature ventricular contractions (PVC, 264±165 in the SHAM group vs 60±37 in the LL-CBS group; P<0.01) during LAD occlusion. Number of episodes of ventricular fibrillation (VF) was 8 in the Control group versus 3 in the LL-CBS group (80% versus 30%, P<0.05). LL-CBS obviously increased high frequency (HF) component (P<0.05) and decreased low frequency/high frequency ratio (P<0.05) compared with the SHAM group. Ischemic size was not affected by LL-CBS between the two groups.

Conclusions

LL-CBS reduced the occurrences of ventricular arrhythmias during acute ischemia without affecting blood pressure. The procedure was associated with changes of electrophysiological characteristics, nerve activity and heart rate variability. Therefore, LL-CBS may protect from ventricular arrhythmias during acute ischemic events by modulating ANS.

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<![CDATA[Insights into the Problem of Alarm Fatigue with Physiologic Monitor Devices: A Comprehensive Observational Study of Consecutive Intensive Care Unit Patients]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9efab0ee8fa60b6ddaf

Purpose

Physiologic monitors are plagued with alarms that create a cacophony of sounds and visual alerts causing “alarm fatigue” which creates an unsafe patient environment because a life-threatening event may be missed in this milieu of sensory overload. Using a state-of-the-art technology acquisition infrastructure, all monitor data including 7 ECG leads, all pressure, SpO2, and respiration waveforms as well as user settings and alarms were stored on 461 adults treated in intensive care units. Using a well-defined alarm annotation protocol, nurse scientists with 95% inter-rater reliability annotated 12,671 arrhythmia alarms.

Results

A total of 2,558,760 unique alarms occurred in the 31-day study period: arrhythmia, 1,154,201; parameter, 612,927; technical, 791,632. There were 381,560 audible alarms for an audible alarm burden of 187/bed/day. 88.8% of the 12,671 annotated arrhythmia alarms were false positives. Conditions causing excessive alarms included inappropriate alarm settings, persistent atrial fibrillation, and non-actionable events such as PVC's and brief spikes in ST segments. Low amplitude QRS complexes in some, but not all available ECG leads caused undercounting and false arrhythmia alarms. Wide QRS complexes due to bundle branch block or ventricular pacemaker rhythm caused false alarms. 93% of the 168 true ventricular tachycardia alarms were not sustained long enough to warrant treatment.

Discussion

The excessive number of physiologic monitor alarms is a complex interplay of inappropriate user settings, patient conditions, and algorithm deficiencies. Device solutions should focus on use of all available ECG leads to identify non-artifact leads and leads with adequate QRS amplitude. Devices should provide prompts to aide in more appropriate tailoring of alarm settings to individual patients. Atrial fibrillation alarms should be limited to new onset and termination of the arrhythmia and delays for ST-segment and other parameter alarms should be configurable. Because computer devices are more reliable than humans, an opportunity exists to improve physiologic monitoring and reduce alarm fatigue.

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<![CDATA[Can Intrapartum Cardiotocography Predict Uterine Rupture among Women with Prior Caesarean Delivery?: A Population Based Case-Control Study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dab9ab0ee8fa60bae09b

Objective

To compare cardiotocographic abnormalities recorded during labour in women with prior caesarean delivery (CD) and complete uterine rupture with those recorded in controls with prior CD without uterine rupture.

Study Design

Women with complete uterine rupture during labour between 1997 and 2008 were identified in the Danish Medical Birth Registry (n = 181). Cases were validated by review of medical records and 53 cases with prior CD, trial of labour, available cardiotocogram (CTG) and complete uterine rupture were included and compared with 43 controls with prior CD, trial of labour and available CTG. The CTG tracings were assessed by 19 independent experts divided into groups of three different experts for each tracing. The assessors were blinded to group, outcome and clinical data. They analyzed occurrence of defined abnormalities and classified the traces as normal, suspicious, pathological or pre-terminal according to international guidelines (FIGO).

Results

A pathological CTG during the first stage of labour was present in 77% of cases and in 53% of the controls (OR 2.58 [CI: 0.96–6.94] P = 0.066). Fetal tachycardia was more frequent in cases with uterine rupture (OR 2.50 [CI: 1.0–6.26] P = 0.053). Significantly more cases showed more than 10 severe variable decelerations compared with controls (OR 22 [CI: 1.54–314.2] P = 0.022). Uterine tachysystole was not correlated with the presence of uterine rupture.

Conclusion

A pathological cardiotocogram should lead to particular attention on threatening uterine rupture but cannot be considered a strong predictor as it is common in all women with trial of labour after caesarean delivery.

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<![CDATA[Recent heart rate history affects QT interval duration in atrial fibrillation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db50ab0ee8fa60bdbe85

QT interval prolongation is associated with a risk of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. QT interval shortens with increasing heart rate and correction for this effect is necessary for meaningful QT interval assessment. We aim to improve current methods of correcting the QT interval during atrial fibrillation (AF). Digitized Holter recordings were analyzed from patients with AF. Models of QT interval dependence on RR intervals were tested by sorting the beats into 20 bins based on corrected RR interval and assessing ST-T variability within the bins. Signal-averaging within bins was performed to determine QT/RR dependence. Data from 30 patients (29 men, 69.3±7.3 years) were evaluated. QT behavior in AF is well described by a linear function (slope ~0.19) of steady-state corrected RR interval. Corrected RR is calculated as a combination of an exponential weight function with time-constant of 2 minutes and a smaller “immediate response” component (weight ~ 0.18). This model performs significantly (p<0.0001) better than models based on instantaneous RR interval only including Bazett and Fridericia. It also outperforms models based on shorter time-constants and other previously proposed models. This model may improve detection of repolarization delay in AF. QT response to heart rate changes in AF is similar to previously published QT dynamics during atrial pacing and in sinus rhythm.

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<![CDATA[A Low-Cost Simulation Model for R-Wave Synchronized Atrial Pacing in Pediatric Patients with Postoperative Junctional Ectopic Tachycardia]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da02ab0ee8fa60b74a1e

Background

Postoperative junctional ectopic tachycardia (JET) occurs frequently after pediatric cardiac surgery. R-wave synchronized atrial (AVT) pacing is used to re-establish atrioventricular synchrony. AVT pacing is complex, with technical pitfalls. We sought to establish and to test a low-cost simulation model suitable for training and analysis in AVT pacing.

Methods

A simulation model was developed based on a JET simulator, a simulation doll, a cardiac monitor, and a pacemaker. A computer program simulated electrocardiograms. Ten experienced pediatric cardiologists tested the model. Their performance was analyzed using a testing protocol with 10 working steps.

Results

Four testers found the simulation model realistic; 6 found it very realistic. Nine claimed that the trial had improved their skills. All testers considered the model useful in teaching AVT pacing. The simulation test identified 5 working steps in which major mistakes in performance test may impede safe and effective AVT pacing and thus permitted specific training. The components of the model (exclusive monitor and pacemaker) cost less than $50. Assembly and training-session expenses were trivial.

Conclusions

A realistic, low-cost simulation model of AVT pacing is described. The model is suitable for teaching and analyzing AVT pacing technique.

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<![CDATA[The APPLE Score – A Novel Score for the Prediction of Rhythm Outcomes after Repeat Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989daa0ab0ee8fa60ba5793

Background

Arrhythmia recurrences after catheter ablation occur in up to 50% within one year but their prediction remains challenging. Recently, we developed a novel score for the prediction of rhythm outcomes after single AF ablation demonstrating superiority to other scores. The current study was performed to 1) prove the predictive value of the APPLE score in patients undergoing repeat AF ablation and 2) compare it with the CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores.

Methods

Rhythm outcome between 3–12 months after AF ablation were documented. The APPLE score (one point for Age >65 years, Persistent AF, imPaired eGFR (<60 ml/min/1.73m2), LA diameter ≥43 mm, EF <50%) was calculated in every patient before procedure.

Results

379 consecutive patients from The Leipzig Heart Center AF Ablation Registry (60±10 years, 65% male, 70% paroxysmal AF) undergoing repeat AF catheter ablation were included. Arrhythmia recurrences were observed in 133 patients (35%). While the CHADS2 (AUC 0.577, p = 0.037) and CHA2DS2-VASc scores (AUC 0.590, p = 0.015) demonstrated low predictive value, the APPLE score showed better prediction of arrhythmia recurrences (AUC 0.617, p = 0.002) than other scores (both p<0.001). Compared to patients with an APPLE score of 0, the risk (OR) for arrhythmia recurrences was 2.9, 3.0 and 6.0 (all p<0.01) for APPLE scores 1, 2, or ≥3, respectively.

Conclusions

The novel APPLE score is superior to the CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores for prediction of rhythm outcomes after repeat AF catheter ablation. It may be helpful to identify patients with low, intermediate or high risk for recurrences after repeat procedure.

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<![CDATA[Calmodulin 2 Mutation N98S Is Associated with Unexplained Cardiac Arrest in Infants Due to Low Clinical Penetrance Electrical Disorders]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989daacab0ee8fa60ba9d43

Background

Calmodulin 1, 2 and 3 (CALM) mutations have been found to cause cardiac arrest in children at a very early age. The underlying aetiology described is long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) and idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF). Little phenotypical data about CALM2 mutations is available.

Objectives

The aim of this paper is to describe the clinical manifestations of the Asn98Ser mutation in CALM2 in two unrelated children in southern Spain with apparently unexplained cardiac arrest/death.

Methods

Two unrelated children aged 4 and 7, who were born to healthy parents, were studied. Both presented with sudden cardiac arrest. The first was resuscitated after a VF episode, and the second died suddenly. In both cases the baseline QTc interval was within normal limits. Peripheral blood DNA was available to perform targeted gene sequencing.

Results

The surviving 4-year-old girl had a positive epinephrine test for LQTS, and polymorphic ventricular ectopic beats were seen on a previous 24-hour Holter recording from the deceased 7-year-old boy, suggestive of a possible underlying CPVT phenotype. A p.Asn98Ser mutation in CALM2 was detected in both cases. This affected a highly conserved across species residue, and the location in the protein was adjacent to critical calcium binding loops in the calmodulin carboxyl-terminal domain, predicting a high pathogenic effect.

Conclusions

Human calmodulin 2 mutation p.Asn98Ser is associated with sudden cardiac death in childhood with a variable clinical penetrance. Our results provide new phenotypical information about clinical behaviour of this mutation.

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<![CDATA[Efficacy and effects on cardiac function of radiofrequency catheter ablation vs. direct current cardioversion of persistent atrial fibrillation with left ventricular systolic dysfunction]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db50ab0ee8fa60bdc040

Objective

To evaluate the effect of catheter ablation vs. direct current synchronized cardioversion (DCC) in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) and left ventricular systolic dysfunction, and to define baseline features of patients that will get more benefit from ablation.

Methods

From July 2013 to October 2014, 97 consecutive single-center patients with persistent AF and symptomatic heart failure (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <50%) underwent DCC followed by amiodarone (n = 40) or circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (PVI; n = 57) according to patient’s preference were recruited in the study. Post-ablation recurrence was treated with atrial roof and mitral isthmus lines ablation with or without PVI based on restoration or not of pulmonary vein (PV) potential conduction. Study outcomes were 12-month rate of sustained sinus rhythm (SR) and cardiac function. Baseline characteristics were compared between patients with and without cardiac function improvement post ablation.

Results

With similarly distributed characteristics at baseline, ablation (mean 1.8 procedures) relative to DCC yielded significantly higher level of 12-month SR maintenance rate (68.42% vs. 35%, P = 0.001); and better LVEF and New York Heart Association class. with significant effect for DCC only in maintained SR cases. Post ablation LVEF increased (>20% or to over 55%) in 31 (54.39%) patients with worse baseline cardiac function and ventricular rate control.

Conclusions

Catheter ablation relative to cardioversion of persistent AF with symptomatic heart failure yielded better 12-month SR maintenance and cardiac function. Compared with non-responders, patients with improved LVEF post-ablation had poorer ventricular rate control and cardiac function at baseline, suggesting a significant component of tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy in this group.

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<![CDATA[Prognostic Role of Ventricular Ectopic Beats in Systemic Sclerosis: A Prospective Cohort Study Shows ECG Indexes Predicting the Worse Outcome]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9f3ab0ee8fa60b6f48d

Background

Arrhythmias are frequent in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) and portend a bad prognosis, accounting alone for 6% of total deaths. Many of these patients die suddenly, thus prevention and intensified risk-stratification represent unmet medical needs. The major goal of this study was the definition of ECG indexes of poor prognosis.

Methods

We performed a prospective cohort study to define the role of 24h-ECG-Holter as an additional risk-stratification technique in the identification of SSc-patients at high risk of life-threatening arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD). One-hundred SSc-patients with symptoms and/or signs suggestive of cardiac involvement underwent 24h-ECG-Holter. The primary end-point was a composite of SCD or need for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD).

Results

Fifty-six patients (56%) had 24h-ECG-Holter abnormalities and 24(24%) presented frequent ventricular ectopic beats (VEBs). The number of VEBs correlated with high-sensitive cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) levels and inversely correlated with left-ventricular ejection fraction (LV-EF) on echocardiography. During a mean follow-up of 23.1±16.0 months, 5 patients died suddenly and two required ICD-implantation. The 7 patients who met the composite end-point had a higher number of VEBs, higher levels of hs-cTnT and NT-proBNP and lower LV-EF (p = 0.001 for all correlations). All these 7 patients had frequent VEBs, while LV-EF was not reduced in all and its range was wide. At ROC curve, VEBs>1190/24h showed 100% of sensitivity and 83% of specificity to predict the primary end-point (AUROC = 0.92,p<0.0001). Patients with VEBS>1190/24h had lower LV-EF and higher hs-cTnT levels and, at multivariate analysis, the presence of increased hs-cTnT and of right bundle branch block on ECG emerged as independent predictors of VEBs>1190/24h. None of demographic or disease-related characteristics emerged as predictors of poor outcome.

Conclusions

VEBS>1190/24h identify patients at high risk of life-threatening arrhythmic complications. Thus, 24h-ECG-Holter should be considered a useful additional risk-stratification test to select SSc-patients at high-risk of SCD, in whom an ICD-implantation could represent a potential life-saving intervention.

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<![CDATA[Diastolic Heart Failure Predicted by Left Atrial Expansion Index in Patients with Severe Diastolic Dysfunction]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9f6ab0ee8fa60b703a6

Background

Left atrial (LA) echocardiographic parameters are increasingly used to predict clinically relevant cardiovascular events. The study aims to evaluate the LA expansion index (LAEI) for predicting diastolic heart failure (HF) in patients with severe left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction.

Methods

This prospective study enrolled 162 patients (65% male) with preserved LV systolic function and severe diastolic dysfunction (132 grade 2 patients, 30 grade 3 patients). All patients had sinus rhythm at enrollment. The LAEI was calculated as (Volmax - Volmin) x 100% / Volmin, where Volmax was defined as maximal LA volume and Volmin was defined as minimal volume. The endpoint was hospitalization for HF withp reserved LV ejection fraction (HFpEF).

Results

The median follow-up duration was 2.9 years. Fifty-four patients had cardiovascular events, including 41 diastolic and 8 systolic HF hospitalizations. In these 54 patients, 13 in-hospital deaths and 5 sudden out-of-hospital deaths occurred. Multivariate analyses revealed that HFpEF was associated with LAEI.and atrial fibrillation during follow-up. For predicting HFpEF, the LAEI had a hazard ratio of 1.197per 10% decrease. In patients who had HFpEF events, the LAEI significantly (P< 0.0001) decreased from 69±18% to 39±11% during hospitalization. Although the LAEI improved during follow-up (53±13%), it did not return to baseline.

Conclusions

The LAEI predicts HFpEF in patients with severe diastolic dysfunction; it worsens during HFpEF events and partially recovers during followup.

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<![CDATA[The Influence of Perioperative Dexmedetomidine on Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: A Meta-Analysis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da07ab0ee8fa60b76212

Background

The use of dexmedetomidine may have benefits on the clinical outcomes of cardiac surgery. We conducted a meta-analysis comparing the postoperative complications in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with dexmedetomidine versus other perioperative medications to determine the influence of perioperative dexmedetomidine on cardiac surgery patients.

Methods

Randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing outcomes in patients who underwent cardiac surgery with dexmedetomidine, another medication, or a placebo were retrieved from EMBASE, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Science Citation Index.

Results

A total of 1702 patients in 14 studies met the selection criteria among 1,535 studies that fit the research strategy. Compared to other medications, dexmedetomidine has combined risk ratios of 0.28 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.15, 0.55, P = 0.0002) for ventricular tachycardia, 0.35 (95% CI 0.20, 0.62, P = 0.0004) for postoperative delirium, 0.76 (95% CI 0.55, 1.06, P = 0.11) for atrial fibrillation, 1.08 (95% CI 0.74, 1.57, P = 0.69) for hypotension, and 2.23 (95% CI 1.36, 3.67, P = 0.001) for bradycardia. In addition, dexmedetomidine may reduce the length of intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stay.

Conclusions

This meta-analysis revealed that the perioperative use of dexmedetomidine in patients undergoing cardiac surgery can reduce the risk of postoperative ventricular tachycardia and delirium, but may increase the risk of bradycardia. The estimates showed a decreased risk of atrial fibrillation, shorter length of ICU stay and hospitalization, and increased risk of hypotension with dexmedetomidine.

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