ResearchPad - tomography https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Retrospectively ECG-gated helical vs. non-ECG-synchronized high-pitch CTA of the aortic root for TAVI planning]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_13825 Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) plays a key role in patient assessment prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). However, to date no consensus has been established on what is the optimal pre-procedural imaging protocol. Variability in pre-TAVI acquisition protocols may lead to discrepancies in aortic annulus measurements and may potentially influence prosthesis size selection.PurposeThe current study evaluates the magnitude of differences in aortic annulus measurements using max-systolic, end-diastolic, and non-ECG-synchronized imaging, as well as the impact of method on prosthesis size selection.Material and methodsFifty consecutive TAVI-candidates, who underwent retrospectively-ECG-gated CT angiography (CTA) of the aortic root, directly followed by non-ECG-synchronized high-pitch CT of the entire aorta, were retrospectively included. Aortic root dimensions were assessed at each 10% increment of the R-R interval (0–100%) and on the non-ECG-synchronized scan. Dimensional changes within the cardiac cycle were evaluated using a 1-way repeated ANOVA. Agreement in measurements between max-systole, end-diastole and non-ECG-synchronized scans was assessed with Bland-Altman analysis.ResultsMaximal dimensions of the aortic root structures and minimum annulus-coronary ostia distances were measured during systole. Max-systolic measurements were significantly and substantially larger than end-diastolic (p<0.001) and non-ECG-synchronized measurements (p<0.001). Due to these discrepancies, the three methods resulted in the same prosthesis size selection in only 48–62% of patients.ConclusionsThe systematic differences between max-systolic, end-diastolic and non-ECG-synchronized measurements for relevant aortic annular dimensions are both statistically significant and clinically relevant. Imaging strategy impacts prosthesis size selection in nearly half the TAVI-candidates. End-diastolic and non-ECG-synchronized imaging does not provide optimal information for prosthesis size selection. Systolic image acquisition is necessary for assessment of maximal annular dimensions and minimum annulus-coronary ostia distances. ]]> <![CDATA[The qualitative assessment of optical coherence tomography and the central retinal sensitivity in patients with retinitis pigmentosa]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7697 To analyze the relationships between qualitative and quantitative parameters of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and the central retinal sensitivity in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP).Materials and methodsNinety-three eyes of 93 patients were finally enrolled, with a median age (quartile) of 58 (24.5) years. We assessed the patients using SD-OCT and the 10–2 program of a Humphry Field Analyzer (HFA). As a qualitative parameter, two graders independently classified the patients’ SD-OCT images into five severity grades (grades 1–5) based on the severity of damage to the photoreceptor inner and outer segments (IS/OS) layer. As quantitative parameters, we measured the IS-ellipsoid zone (IS-EZ) width, IS/OS thickness, outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness, central macular thickness (CMT, 1 and 3 mm) and macular cube (6 × 6 mm) volume and thickness. The central retinal sensitivity was defined by the best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA; logMAR), average sensitivities of the central 4 (foveal sensitivity [FS]) and 12 (macular sensitivity [MS]) points of the HFA 10–2 program and the mean deviation (MD) of the 10–2 program. Spearman’s correlation was used to assess the association between both qualitative and quantitative parameters and variables of the central retinal sensitivity. In addition, we performed a multiple regression analysis using these parameters to identify the parameters most strongly influencing the central retinal sensitivity.ResultsThe IS/OS severity grade was significantly correlated with the BCVA (ρ = 0.741, P < 0.001), FS (ρ = −0.844, P < 0.001), MS (ρ = −0.820, P < 0.001) and MD (ρ = −0.681, P < 0.001) and showed stronger correlations to them than any other quantitative parameters including the IS-EZ width, IS/OS thickness, ONL thickness, CMTs and macular cube volume/thickness. Furthermore, a step-wise multiple regression analysis indicated that the IS/OS severity grade was more strongly associated with the BCVA (β = 0.659, P < 0.001), FS (β = −0.820, P < 0.001), MS (β = −0.820, P < 0.001) and MD (β = −0.674, P < 0.001) than any other quantitative parameters. The intraclass correlation coefficient between two graders indicated substantial correlation (κ = 0.70).DiscussionThe qualitative grading of OCT based on the severity of the IS/OS layer was simple and strongly correlated with the central retinal sensitivity in patients with RP. It may be useful to assess the central visual function in patients with RP, although there is some variation in severity within the same severity grade. ]]> <![CDATA[Clinical and radiological changes of hospitalised patients with COVID-19 pneumonia from disease onset to acute exacerbation: a multicentre paired cohort study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Nd7aaed28-46e2-47f0-a5a2-b8580154aa0b To analyse clinical and radiological changes from disease onset to exacerbation in coronavirus infectious disease-19 (COVID-19) patients.MethodsWe reviewed clinical histories of 276 patients with confirmed COVID-19 pneumonia and extracted data on patients who met the diagnostic criteria for COVID-19 severe/fatal pneumonia and had an acute exacerbation starting with mild or common pneumonia.ResultsTwenty-four patients were included. Of these, 8% were smokers, 54% had been to Wuhan, and 46% had comorbidities. Before acute exacerbation, elevated lactate dehydrogenase (232.9 ± 88.7) was present, and chest CT scans showed the number of involved lobes was 4 (2–5) and total CT score was 6 (2–8). Following acute exacerbation, patients were likely to have more clinical symptoms (p < 0.01) and abnormal laboratory changes (p < 0.01). The number of involved lobes and CT score after an exacerbation significantly increased to 5 (5–5) and 12 (9–14), respectively. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve showed that, when the cutoff value of CT score was 5, the sensitivity and specificity for severe pneumonia were 90% and 70%, respectively. CT findings of ground glass opacity with consolidations (91.7%), bilateral distribution (100.0%), and multifocal lesion (100.0%) were features in found in patients after exacerbation.ConclusionsThere are significant changes in clinical, laboratory, and CT findings in patients from disease onset to exacerbation. An increase in the number of involved lobes or an increased CT score from the baseline may predict poor clinical outcomes. Combining an assessment of CT changes with clinical and laboratory changes could help clinical teams evaluate the prognosis.Key Points • The common chest CT signs of COVID-19 pneumonia after exacerbation were ground glass opacity (GGO) with consolidation, bilateral distribution, and multifocal lesions. • An increase in number of involved lobes or an increased CT score from the baseline may predict a poor clinical outcome. • Worsened symptoms and abnormal laboratory results are also associated with poor prognosis. ]]> <![CDATA[Clustered micronodules as predominant manifestation on CT: A sign of active but indolently evolving pulmonary tuberculosis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N48b20e2f-c3ed-4c3c-a251-c583ed3c8c8a

Objective

To investigate the prevalence, patient characteristics, and natural history of clustered micronodules (CMs) in active pulmonary tuberculosis.

Materials and methods

From January 2013 through July 2018, 833 consecutive patients with bacteriologically or polymerase chain reaction–proven active pulmonary tuberculosis were retrospectively evaluated. CMs were defined as a localized aggregation of multiple dense discrete micronodules, which primarily distributed around small airways distal to the level of the segmental bronchus: small airways surrounded by CMs maintained luminal patency and the CMs might coalesce into a larger nodule. The patients were dichotomized according to whether the predominant computed tomography (CT) abnormalities were CMs. We analyzed radiologic and pathologic findings in patients whose predominant diagnostic CT abnormalities were CMs, along with those of incidental pre-diagnostic CT scans, if available. Chi-square, McNemar, Student t-test and Wilcoxon-signed rank test were performed.

Results

CMs were the predominant CT abnormality in 2.6% of the patients (22/833, 95% CI, 1.8–4.0%) with less sputum smear-positivity (4.8% vs 31.0%; p = .010) and a similar proportion of immunocompromised status (40.9% vs 46.0%; p = .637) than those without having CMs as the predominant CT abnormality. The time interval for minimal radiologic progression was 6.4 months. The extent of CMs increased with disease progression, frequently accompanied by consolidation and small airway wall thickening. Pathologically, smaller CMs were non-caseating granulomas confined to the peribronchiolar interstitium, whereas larger CMs were caseating granulomas involving lung parenchyma. Two of the five patients with a pre-diagnostic CT scan obtained more than 50 months pre-diagnosis showed an incipient stage of CMs, in which they were small peribronchiolar nodules.

Conclusion

Active pulmonary tuberculosis manifested predominantly as CMs in 2.6% of patients, with scarce of acid-fast bacilli smear-positivity and no association with impaired host immunity. CMs indolently progressed, accompanied by consolidation and small airway wall thickening, and originated from small nodules.

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<![CDATA[Severe hyperbilirubinemia is associated with higher risk of contrast-related acute kidney injury following contrast-enhanced computed tomography]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N624c57d4-8983-4ece-aecc-e0e7860066cf

Introduction

Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) is associated with high risks of morbidity and mortality. Hyperbilirubinemia might have some renal protection but with no clear cutoff value for protection. Related studies are typically on limited numbers of patients and only in conditions of vascular intervention.

Methods

We performed this study to elucidate CI-AKI in patients after contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CCT). The outcomes were CI-AKI, dialysis and mortality. Patients were divided to three groups based on their serum levels of total bilirubin: ≤1.2 mg/dl, 1.3–2.0 mg/dl, and >2.0 mg/dl.

Results

We enrolled a total of 9,496 patients who had received CCT. Patients with serum total bilirubin >2.0 mg/dl were associated with CI-AKI. Those undergoing dialysis had the highest incidence of PC-AKI (p<0.001). No difference was found between the two groups of total bilirubin ≤1.2 and 1.3–2.0 mg/dl. Patients with total bilirubin >2mg/dl were associated with CI-AKI (OR = 1.89, 1.53–2.33 of 95% CI), dialysis (OR = 1.40, 1.01–1.95 of 95% CI) and mortality (OR = 1.63, 1.38–1.93 of 95% CI) after adjusting for laboratory data and all comorbidities (i.e., cerebrovascular disease, coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease, and acute myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, gastrointestinal bleeding, cirrhosis, peritonitis, ascites, hepatoma, shock lung and colon cancer). We concluded that total bilirubin level >2 mg/dl is an independent risk factor for CI-AKI, dialysis and mortality after CCT. These patients also had high risks for cirrhosis or hepatoma.

Conclusion

This is the first study providing evidence that hyperbilirubinemia (total bilirubin >2.0 mg/dl) being an independent risk factor for CI-AKI, dialysis and mortality after receiving CCT. Most patients with total bilirubin >2.0mg/dl had cirrhosis or hepatoma.

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<![CDATA[Switchable resolution in soft x-ray tomography of single cells]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N83fafb3a-9522-40a6-a68c-b2c601c68e90

The diversity of living cells, in both size and internal complexity, calls for imaging methods with adaptable spatial resolution. Soft x-ray tomography (SXT) is a three-dimensional imaging technique ideally suited to visualizing and quantifying the internal organization of single cells of varying sizes in a near-native state. The achievable resolution of the soft x-ray microscope is largely determined by the objective lens, but switching between objectives is extremely time-consuming and typically undertaken only during microscope maintenance procedures. Since the resolution of the optic is inversely proportional to the depth of focus, an optic capable of imaging the thickest cells is routinely selected. This unnecessarily limits the achievable resolution in smaller cells and eliminates the ability to obtain high-resolution images of regions of interest in larger cells. Here, we describe developments to overcome this shortfall and allow selection of microscope optics best suited to the specimen characteristics and data requirements. We demonstrate that switchable objective capability advances the flexibility of SXT to enable imaging cells ranging in size from bacteria to yeast and mammalian cells without physically modifying the microscope, and we demonstrate the use of this technology to image the same specimen with both optics.

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<![CDATA[Neuroimaging modality fusion in Alzheimer’s classification using convolutional neural networks]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N4bce0426-e39d-45a0-9dc9-42db4f6cba04

Automated methods for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) classification have the potential for great clinical benefits and may provide insight for combating the disease. Machine learning, and more specifically deep neural networks, have been shown to have great efficacy in this domain. These algorithms often use neurological imaging data such as MRI and FDG PET, but a comprehensive and balanced comparison of the MRI and amyloid PET modalities has not been performed. In order to accurately determine the relative strength of each imaging variant, this work performs a comparison study in the context of Alzheimer’s dementia classification using the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset with identical neural network architectures. Furthermore, this work analyzes the benefits of using both modalities in a fusion setting and discusses how these data types may be leveraged in future AD studies using deep learning.

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<![CDATA[Exploit fully automatic low-level segmented PET data for training high-level deep learning algorithms for the corresponding CT data]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c8823d0d5eed0c484639091

We present an approach for fully automatic urinary bladder segmentation in CT images with artificial neural networks in this study. Automatic medical image analysis has become an invaluable tool in the different treatment stages of diseases. Especially medical image segmentation plays a vital role, since segmentation is often the initial step in an image analysis pipeline. Since deep neural networks have made a large impact on the field of image processing in the past years, we use two different deep learning architectures to segment the urinary bladder. Both of these architectures are based on pre-trained classification networks that are adapted to perform semantic segmentation. Since deep neural networks require a large amount of training data, specifically images and corresponding ground truth labels, we furthermore propose a method to generate such a suitable training data set from Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography image data. This is done by applying thresholding to the Positron Emission Tomography data for obtaining a ground truth and by utilizing data augmentation to enlarge the dataset. In this study, we discuss the influence of data augmentation on the segmentation results, and compare and evaluate the proposed architectures in terms of qualitative and quantitative segmentation performance. The results presented in this study allow concluding that deep neural networks can be considered a promising approach to segment the urinary bladder in CT images.

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<![CDATA[Advanced approach to analyzing calcareous protists for present and past pelagic ecology: Comprehensive analysis of 3D-morphology, stable isotopes, and genes of planktic foraminifers]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c8acce4d5eed0c484990244

Marine protists play an important role in oceanic ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles. However, the difficulties in culturing pelagic protists indicate that their ecology and behavior remain poorly understood; phylogeographic studies based on single-cell genetic analyses have often shown that they are highly divergent at the biological species level, with variable geographic distributions. This indicates that their ecology could be complex. On the other hand, the biomineral (calcareous) shells of planktic foraminifers are widely used in geochemical analyses to estimate marine paleoenvironmental characteristics (i.e., temperature), because the shell chemical composition reflects ambient seawater conditions. Among the pelagic protists, planktic foraminifers are ideal study candidates to develop a combined approach of genetic, morphological, and geochemical methods, thus reflecting environmental and ecological characteristics. The present study precisely tested whether the DNA extraction process physically and chemically affects the shells of the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber. We used a nondestructive method for analyzing physical changes (micro-focus X-ray computed tomography (MXCT) scanning) to compare specimens at the pre- and post-DNA extraction stages. Our results demonstrate that DNA extraction has no significant effect on shell density and thickness. We measured stable carbon and oxygen isotopes on the shell of each individual in a negative control or one of two DNA-extracted groups and detected no significant differences in isotopic values among the three groups. Moreover, we evaluated isotopic variations at the biological species level with regard to their ecological characteristics such as depth habitat, life stages, and symbionts. Thus, our examination of the physiochemical effects on biomineral shells through DNA extraction shows that morphological and isotopic analyses of foraminifers can be combined with genetic analysis. These analytical methods are applicable to other shell-forming protists and microorganisms. In this study, we developed a powerful analytical tool for use in ecological and environmental studies of modern and past oceans.

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<![CDATA[MRI, CT and high resolution macro-anatomical images with cryosectioning of a Beagle brain: Creating the base of a multimodal imaging atlas]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c8acc89d5eed0c48498f996

Most common methods that directly show macro- or microscopic anatomy of the brain usually require the removal of the organ from the neurocranium. However, the brain can be revealed in situ by using proper sectioning techniques. Our aim was to both improve the cryosectioning method, test its limits and create a high-resolution macro-anatomical image series of a Beagle brain, which at the time of the study did not exist. A two-year-old female Beagle has been scanned with CT and MRI ante and post mortem, then the arteries of the head were filled with red resin. After freezing to -80°C, a neurocranium block was created and was embedded into a water-gelatin mix. Using a special milling device and a DSLR camera, 1112 consecutive RGB-color cryosections were made with a 100 μm layer thickness and captured in high resolution (300 dpi, 24-bit color, and pixel size was 19.5 x 19.5 μm). Image post-processing was done with Adobe Photoshop CS3 and Thermo Scientific Amira 6.0 softwares, and as a result of the proper alignment and coregistration, visualization and comparing was possible with all the applied imaging modalities (CT, MRI, cryosectioning) in any arbitrary plane. Surface models from the arteries, veins, brain and skull were also generated after segmentation in the same coordinate system, giving a unique opportunity for comparing the two-dimensional and three-dimensional anatomy. This is the first study which focuses directly to this high-definition multimodal visualization of the canine brain, and it provides the most accurate results compared to previous cryosectioning studies, as using an improved method, higher image quality, more detailed image, proper color fidelity and lower artefact formation were achieved. Based on the methodology we described, it can serve as a base for future multimodal (CT, MR, augmented- or virtual reality) imaging atlases for medical, educational and scientific purposes.

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<![CDATA[Is there a reliable size cut-off for splenic involvement in lymphoma? A [18F]FDG-PET controlled study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c8c1956d5eed0c484b4d428

Purpose

Aim of present study was to determine whether the currently recommended 13-cm cranio-caudal diameter cut-off on CT for assessment of splenic involvement in lymphoma offers adequate sensitivity and specificity.

Materials and Methods

Patients with histologically proven lymphoma who had undergone [18F]FDG-PET/CT before therapy were included. Cranio-caudal diameters of the spleen were measured on the CT component of PET/CT, and ROC analyses with calculation of respective areas under the curve (AUC) were used to determine cut-off values of cranio-caudal measurements with their respective sensitivities and specificities, using [18F]FDG-PET as the reference standard.

Results

In 93 patients, we found a sensitivity of 74.1% and a specificity of 47% for the 13-cm splenic diameter cut-off.

Conclusions

Our results show reasonable, though far from perfect sensitivities and specificities for the currently recommend 13-cm splenic diameter cut-off.

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<![CDATA[Renal imaging in 199 Dutch patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome: Screening compliance and outcome]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c8accc2d5eed0c48498ff04

Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is associated with an increased risk for renal cell carcinoma. Surveillance is recommended, but the optimal imaging method and screening interval remain to be defined. The main aim of our study was to evaluate the outcomes of RCC surveillance to get insight in the safety of annual US in these patients. Surveillance data and medical records of 199 patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome were collected retrospectively using medical files and a questionnaire. These patients were diagnosed in two Dutch hospitals and data were collected until June 2014. A first screening for renal cell carcinoma was performed in 172/199 patients (86%). Follow-up data were available from 121 patients. The mean follow-up period per patient was 4.2 years. Of the patients known to be under surveillance, 83% was screened at least annually and 94% at least every two years. Thirty-eight renal cell carcinomas had occurred in 23 patients. The mean age at diagnosis of the first tumour was 51. Eighteen tumours were visualized by ultrasound. Nine small tumours (7–27 mm) were visible on MRI or CT and not detected using ultrasound. Our data indicate that compliance to renal screening is relatively high. Furthermore, ultrasound might be a sensitive, cheap and widely available alternative for MRI or part of the MRIs for detecting clinically relevant renal tumours in BHD patients,but the limitations should be considered carefully. Data from larger cohorts are necessary to confirm these observations.

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<![CDATA[Comparison of acute vertigo diagnosis and treatment practices between otolaryngologists and non-otolaryngologists: A multicenter scenario-based survey]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c9902a2d5eed0c484b982b9

Acute vertigo is a common problem in emergency departments. However, clinical strategies of acute vertigo care vary among care providers. The aim of the study was to investigate differences in diagnosis [Dix-Hallpike test, the head impulse, nystagmus, and the test of skew (HINTS) procedure, and imaging modalities] and treatment (pharmacological treatments and the Epley maneuver) by otolaryngologists and non-otolaryngologists in emergency medicine settings. We used a multicenter case-based survey for the study. Four clinical vignettes of acute vertigo (posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, vestibular neuritis, Meniere disease, and nonspecific vertigo) were used. Total 151 physicians from all study sites participated in the study. There were 84 non-otolaryngologists (48 emergency physicians and 36 internists) and 67 otolaryngologists. The multivariate analysis indicated that otolaryngologists ordered fewer CT scans (odds ratio (OR), 0.20; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.07–0.53) and performed fewer HINTS procedures (OR, 0.17; 95% CI, 0.06–0.46), but used the Dix-Hallpike method more often (OR, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.01–5.52) for diagnosis compared to non-otolaryngologists. For treatment, otolaryngologists were less likely to use the Epley method (OR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.07–0.53) and metoclopramide (OR, 0.09; 95% CI, 0.01–0.97) and more likely to use sodium bicarbonate (OR, 20.50; 95% CI, 6.85–61.40) compared to non-otolaryngologists. We found significant differences in the acute vertigo care provided by non-otolaryngologists and otolaryngologists from a vignette-based research. To improve acute vertigo care, educational systems focusing on acute vertigo are needed.

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<![CDATA[Comparing the diagnostic performance of radiation dose-equivalent radiography, multi-detector computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography for finger fractures – A phantom study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c8823e0d5eed0c4846391da

Purpose

To compare the diagnostic performance and raters´confidence of radiography, radiography equivalent dose multi-detector computed tomography (RED-MDCT) and radiography equivalent dose cone beam computed tomography (RED-CBCT) for finger fractures.

Methods

Fractures were inflicted artificially and randomly to 10 cadaveric hands of body donors. Radiography as well as RED-MDCT and RED-CBCT imaging were performed at dose settings equivalent to radiography. Images were de-identified and analyzed by three radiologists regarding finger fractures, joint involvement and confidence with their findings. Reference standard was consensus reading by two radiologists of the fracturing protocol and high-dose multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) images. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated and compared with Cochrane´s Q and post hoc analysis. Rater´s confidence was calculated with Friedman Test and post hoc Nemenyi Test.

Results

Rater´s confidence, inter-rater correlation, specificity for fractures and joint involvement were higher in RED-MDCT and RED-CBCT compared to radiography. No differences between the modalities were found regarding sensitivity.

Conclusion

In this phantom study, radiography equivalent dose computed tomography (RED-CT) demonstrates a partly higher diagnostic accuracy than radiography. Implementing RED-CT in the diagnostic work-up of finger fractures could improve diagnostics, support correct classification and adequate treatment. Clinical studies should be performed to confirm these preliminary results.

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<![CDATA[An anatomical study on lumbar arteries related to the extrapedicular approach applied during lumbar PVP (PKP)]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c8823e7d5eed0c48463929f

To observe the regional anatomy of the lumbar artery (LA) associated with the extrapedicular approach applied during percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) and percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP), we collected 78 samples of abdominal computed tomography angiography imaging data. We measured the nearest distance from the center of the vertebral body puncture point to the LA (distance VBPP-LA, DVBPP-LA). According to the DVBPP-LA, four zones, Zone I, Zone II, Zone III and Zone IV, were identified. LAs that passed through these zones were called Type I, Type II, Type III and Type IV LAs, respectively. A portion of the lumbar vertebrae had an intersegmental branch that originated from the upper segmental LA and extended longitudinally across the lateral wall of the pedicle; it was called Type V LA. Compared with the DVBPP-LA in L1, L2, L3 and L4, the overall difference and between-group differences were significant (P < 0.05). In L1, L2, L3, L4 and L5, there were 8, 4, 4, 0 and 1 Type I LAs, respectively. There were no Type V LAs in L1 and L2, but there were 2, 16 and 26 Type V LAs in L3, L4 and L5, respectively. In L1-L5, the numbers of Type I LA plus Type V LA were 8, 4, 6, 16 and 27, and the presence ratios were 5.1%, 2.6%, 5.6%, 10.3% and 17.3%, respectively. In L4 and L5, the male presence ratios of Type I LA plus Type V LA were 7.1% and 10.7%, respectively, and the female presence ratios were 13.9% and 25.0%, respectively. Thus, extrapedicular PVP (PKP) in lumbar vertebrae had a risk of LA injury and was not suggested for use in L4 and L5, especially in female patients.

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<![CDATA[Brief communication: β-cell function influences dopamine receptor availability]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c8c1952d5eed0c484b4d3f2

We aim to identify physiologic regulators of dopamine (DA) signaling in obesity but previously did not find a compelling relationship with insulin sensitivity measured by oral-minimal model (OMM) and DA subtype 2 and 3 receptor (D2/3R) binding potential (BPND). Reduced disposition index (DI), a β-cell function metric that can also be calculated by OMM, was shown to predict a negative reward behavior that occurs in states of lower endogenous DA. We hypothesized that reduced DI would occur with higher D2/3R BPND, reflecting lower endogenous DA. Participants completed PET scanning, with a displaceable radioligand to measure D2/3R BPND, and a 5-hour oral glucose tolerance test to measure DI by OMM. We studied 26 age-similar females without (n = 8) and with obesity (n = 18) (22 vs 39 kg/m2). Reduced DI predicted increased striatal D2/3R BPND independent of BMI. By accounting for β-cell function, we were able to determine that the state of insulin and glucose metabolism is pertinent to striatal D2/3R BPND in obesity.

Clinical Trial Registration Number: NCT00802204

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<![CDATA[Shrinkage of hepatocellular carcinoma after radiofrequency ablation following transcatheter arterial chemoembolization: Analysis of contributing factors]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c818e88d5eed0c484cc24bb

Objective

This study was conducted to investigate tumor shrinkage and influencing factors in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from radiofrequency (RF) ablation following transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE).

Methods

A total of 222 patients underwent combined sequential treatment of TACE and RF ablation for HCC at our institution between 2008 and 2014. Of those, 86 patients (men, 68; women, 18) who achieved compact iodized oil tagging and complete ablation were included for this retrospective study. We measured three-dimensional tumor diameters and calculated tumor volumes on pre-treatment CT/MRI and follow-up CT scans performed post-TACE, post-ablation, and 1 month post-treatment, respectively. To compare periodically generated tumor diameters and volumes, repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to identify factors impacting tumor shrinkage after RF ablation.

Results

Diameters and volumes of HCCs declined significantly in the immediate aftermath of RF ablation (i.e., between post-TACE and post-ablation CT scans) (p < 0.001, for both). Mean reduction rates in tumor diameter and volume immediately after RF ablation were 18.2 ± 9.1% and 44.4 ± 14.6%, respectively. Of note, tumors of left hepatic lobe and in subphrenic or perivascular locations showed lower rates of post-ablative volume reduction than those in counterpart locations (p = 0.002, 0.046, 0.024, respectively). Tumor size and liver function did not influence tumor shrinkage after RF ablation.

Conclusion

In patients with HCC, significant tumor shrinkage occurs immediately after RF ablation. The degree of shrinkage in response to ablative treatment seems to vary by tumor location.

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<![CDATA[The association of choroidal structure and its response to anti-VEGF treatment with the short-time outcome in pachychoroid neovasculopathy]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6f14b7d5eed0c48467a726

Pachychoroid neovasculopathy (PNV) shares some anatomical features with other pachychoroid spectrum diseases, but little is known about the characteristics on the treatment with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We investigated the effect of choroidal structure and responses to anti-VEGF on the prognosis of pachychoroid neovasculopathy (PNV) and other types of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (non-PNV). Twenty-one eyes with PNV and 34 eyes with non-PNV who had anti-VEGF treatment were retrospectively reviewed. Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) area at baseline was measured with fluorescein angiography (FAG). The luminal and stromal area in the choroid was measured by enhanced-depth-imaging (EDI) OCT at baseline and 1 month. The association between dry macula or LogMAR VA (visual acuity, VA) at 1 month and baseline values or changes in the luminal or stromal area at 1 month, baseline CNV area, or anti-VEGF drugs were analyzed in patients with or without PNV. In non-PNV, change of luminal area (coefficient = 7.0×10−5, p = 0.0001), baseline CNV area (coefficient = 0.18, p = 0.033), and aflibercept vs. ranibizumab (coefficient = 0.29, p = 0.0048) were chosen as predictors for dry macula by the model selection. Similarly, in non-PNV, change of luminal area (coefficient = 6.1×10−6, p = 0.033), baseline CNV area (coefficient = 0.034, p = 0.022), and aflibercept vs. ranibizumab (coefficient = 0.056, p = 0.0020) were chosen as predictors for greater VA improvement. In PNV, however, none of these factors was chosen as predictors for dry macula or VA improvement by the model selection. The result of the present study implied that structural response after anti-VEGF might be different between non-PNV and PNV in the treatment with anti-VEGF agents.

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<![CDATA[RaCaT: An open source and easy to use radiomics calculator tool]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c76fe64d5eed0c484e5b9d0

Purpose

The widely known field ‘Radiomics’ aims to provide an extensive image based phenotyping of e.g. tumors using a wide variety of feature values extracted from medical images. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that feature values calculated by different institutes follow the same feature definitions. For this purpose, the imaging biomarker standardization initiative (IBSI) provides detailed mathematical feature descriptions, as well as (mathematical) test phantoms and corresponding reference feature values. We present here an easy to use radiomic feature calculator, RaCaT, which provides the calculation of a large number of radiomic features for all kind of medical images which are in compliance with the standard.

Methods

The calculator is implemented in C++ and comes as a standalone executable. Therefore, it can be easily integrated in any programming language, but can also be called from the command line. No programming skills are required to use the calculator. The software architecture is highly modularized so that it is easily extendible. The user can also download the source code, adapt it if needed and build the calculator from source. The calculated feature values are compliant with the ones provided by the IBSI standard. Source code, example files for the software configuration, and documentation can be found online on GitHub (https://github.com/ellipfaehlerUMCG/RaCat).

Results

The comparison with the standard values shows that all calculated features as well as image preprocessing steps, comply with the IBSI standard. The performance is also demonstrated on clinical examples.

Conclusions

The authors successfully implemented an easy to use Radiomics calculator that can be called from any programming language or from the command line. Image preprocessing and feature settings and calculations can be adjusted by the user.

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<![CDATA[C-shaped canals in first and second mandibular molars from Brazilian individuals: A prevalence study using cone-beam computed tomography]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6dc9d2d5eed0c48452a238

Introduction

The study aimed to evaluate, through in vivo tomographic analysis, the prevalence of C-shaped canals in mandibular first and second molars of Brazilian individuals, analyzing its frequency by thirds of the roots, and in contralateral teeth.

Methods

Images of 801 mandibular molars (379 first molars and 422 second molars) from 334 Brazilian individuals (142 men and 192 women) were identified through 1544 cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) exams, obtained from a private oral radiologic clinic. The cross-sectional configurations were analyzed to determine the frequency of C-shaped canals at three different axial levels and classified in categories by three experienced endodontists independently.

Results

The incidence of C-shaped canals was 181 (23%). Considering the type of tooth, 91 (24.01%) were identified in the first molars, and 90 (21.32%) were found in the second molars. The incidence was significantly higher in female individuals (P < 0.05) for both first and second molars. The most common C-shaped canal configurations were: C1 (89.01% for first molars and 90% second molars), followed by C2 (8.79% for first molars and 6.66% for second molars) and C4 (2.19% for the first molars and 3.33% for the second molars). Bilateral C-shaped canals were significantly higher than unilateral for both first and second molars (P < 0.01).

Conclusions

The prevalence of C-shaped canals in mandibular molars of the Brazilian individuals was higher than previously reported for both mandibular first (24.01%) and second molars (21.32%). The incidence was significantly higher in female individuals and the coronal portion of the roots. The classic C-shaped format “C1” was the most frequent anatomical configuration. Furthermore, the prevalence of bilateral C-shaped canals was higher for the first molar (61.70%) and lower for the second molar (38.29%).

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