ResearchPad - trauma-medicine https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Effect of experimental, morphological and mechanical factors on the murine spinal cord subjected to transverse contusion: A finite element study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_8463 Finite element models combined with animal experimental models of spinal cord injury provides the opportunity for investigating the effects of the injury mechanism on the neural tissue deformation and the resulting tissue damage. Thus, we developed a finite element model of the mouse cervical spinal cord in order to investigate the effect of morphological, experimental and mechanical factors on the spinal cord mechanical behavior subjected to transverse contusion. The overall mechanical behavior of the model was validated with experimental data of unilateral cervical contusion in mice. The effects of the spinal cord material properties, diameter and curvature, and of the impactor position and inclination on the strain distribution were investigated in 8 spinal cord anatomical regions of interest for 98 configurations of the model. Pareto analysis revealed that the material properties had a significant effect (p<0.01) for all regions of interest of the spinal cord and was the most influential factor for 7 out of 8 regions. This highlighted the need for comprehensive mechanical characterization of the gray and white matter in order to develop effective models capable of predicting tissue deformation during spinal cord injuries.

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<![CDATA[A new finite element based parameter to predict bone fracture]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N73efbb2c-4546-457e-9797-023764c15f47

Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry (DXA) is currently the most widely adopted non-invasive clinical technique to assess bone mineral density and bone mineral content in human research and represents the primary tool for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. DXA measures areal bone mineral density, BMD, which does not account for the three-dimensional structure of the vertebrae and for the distribution of bone mass. The result is that longitudinal DXA can only predict about 70% of vertebral fractures. This study proposes a complementary tool, based on Finite Element (FE) models, to improve the DXA accuracy. Bone is simulated as elastic and inhomogeneous material, with stiffness distribution derived from DXA greyscale images of density. The numerical procedure simulates a compressive load on each vertebra to evaluate the local minimum principal strain values. From these values, both the local average and the maximum strains are computed over the cross sections and along the height of the analysed bone region, to provide a parameter, named Strain Index of Bone (SIB), which could be considered as a bone fragility index. The procedure is initially validated on 33 cylindrical trabecular bone samples obtained from porcine lumbar vertebrae, experimentally tested under static compressive loading. Comparing the experimental mechanical parameters with the SIB, we could find a higher correlation of the ultimate stress, σULT, with the SIB values (R2adj = 0.63) than that observed with the conventional DXA-based clinical parameters, i.e. Bone Mineral Density, BMD (R2adj = 0.34) and Trabecular Bone Score, TBS (R2adj = -0.03). The paper finally presents a few case studies of numerical simulations carried out on human lumbar vertebrae. If our results are confirmed in prospective studies, SIB could be used—together with BMD and TBS—to improve the fracture risk assessment and support the clinical decision to assume specific drugs for metabolic bone diseases.

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<![CDATA[Microglia exit the CNS in spinal root avulsion]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c79a3e5d5eed0c4841d1bf2

Microglia are central nervous system (CNS)-resident cells. Their ability to migrate outside of the CNS, however, is not understood. Using time-lapse imaging in an obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI) model, we show that microglia squeeze through the spinal boundary and emigrate to peripheral spinal roots. Although both macrophages and microglia respond, microglia are the debris-clearing cell. Once outside the CNS, microglia re-enter the spinal cord in an altered state. These peripheral nervous system (PNS)-experienced microglia can travel to distal CNS areas from the injury site, including the brain, with debris. This emigration is balanced by two mechanisms—induced emigration via N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA) dependence and restriction via contact-dependent cellular repulsion with macrophages. These discoveries open the possibility that microglia can migrate outside of their textbook-defined regions in disease states.

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<![CDATA[Comparing the diagnostic performance of radiation dose-equivalent radiography, multi-detector computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography for finger fractures – A phantom study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c8823e0d5eed0c4846391da

Purpose

To compare the diagnostic performance and raters´confidence of radiography, radiography equivalent dose multi-detector computed tomography (RED-MDCT) and radiography equivalent dose cone beam computed tomography (RED-CBCT) for finger fractures.

Methods

Fractures were inflicted artificially and randomly to 10 cadaveric hands of body donors. Radiography as well as RED-MDCT and RED-CBCT imaging were performed at dose settings equivalent to radiography. Images were de-identified and analyzed by three radiologists regarding finger fractures, joint involvement and confidence with their findings. Reference standard was consensus reading by two radiologists of the fracturing protocol and high-dose multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) images. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated and compared with Cochrane´s Q and post hoc analysis. Rater´s confidence was calculated with Friedman Test and post hoc Nemenyi Test.

Results

Rater´s confidence, inter-rater correlation, specificity for fractures and joint involvement were higher in RED-MDCT and RED-CBCT compared to radiography. No differences between the modalities were found regarding sensitivity.

Conclusion

In this phantom study, radiography equivalent dose computed tomography (RED-CT) demonstrates a partly higher diagnostic accuracy than radiography. Implementing RED-CT in the diagnostic work-up of finger fractures could improve diagnostics, support correct classification and adequate treatment. Clinical studies should be performed to confirm these preliminary results.

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<![CDATA[Identification of Merkel cells associated with neurons in engineered skin substitutes after grafting to full thickness wounds]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c8823d9d5eed0c484639153

Engineered skin substitutes (ESS), prepared using primary human fibroblasts and keratinocytes with a biopolymer scaffold, were shown to provide stable closure of excised burns, but relatively little is known about innervation of ESS after grafting. This study investigated innervation of ESS and, specifically, whether Merkel cells are present in healed grafts. Merkel cells are specialized neuroendocrine cells required for fine touch sensation in skin. We discovered cells positive for keratin 20 (KRT20), a general marker for Merkel cells, in the basal epidermis of ESS after transplantation to mice, suggesting the presence of Merkel cells. Cells expressing KRT20 were not observed in ESS in vitro. However, widely separated KRT20-positive cells were observed in basal epidermis of ESS by 2 weeks after grafting. By 4 weeks, these cells increased in number and expressed keratins 18 and 19, additional Merkel cells markers. Putative Merkel cell numbers increased further between weeks 6 and 14; their densities varied widely and no specific pattern of organization was observed, similar to Merkel cell localization in human skin. KRT20-positive cells co-expressed epidermal markers E-cadherin and keratin 15, suggesting derivation from the epidermal lineage, and neuroendocrine markers synaptophysin and chromogranin A, consistent with their identification as Merkel cells. By 4 weeks after grafting, some Merkel cells in engineered skin were associated with immature afferents expressing neurofilament-medium. By 8 weeks, Merkel cells were complexed with more mature neurons expressing neurofilament-heavy. Positive staining for human leukocyte antigen demonstrated that the Merkel cells in ESS were derived from grafted human cells. The results identify, for the first time, Merkel cell-neurite complexes in engineered skin in vivo. This suggests that fine touch sensation may be restored in ESS after grafting, although this must be confirmed with future functional studies.

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<![CDATA[Mental health in individuals with spinal cord injury: The role of socioeconomic conditions and social relationships]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c76fe0dd5eed0c484e5b386

Objectives

To evaluate socioeconomic inequalities in social relationships, and to assess whether socioeconomic conditions and social relationships are independently related to mental health problems in individuals with a physical disability due to spinal cord injury (SCI).

Methods

We analyzed cross-sectional data from 511 individuals with SCI aged over 16 years who participated in the community survey of the Swiss SCI Cohort Study (SwiSCI). Indicators for socioeconomic conditions included years of formal education, household income, and financial strain. Social relationships were operationalized by three structural (partner status; social contact frequency; number of supportive relationships) and four functional aspects (satisfaction with: overall social support; family relationships; contacts to friends; partner relationship). General mental health was assessed by the Mental Health Inventory (MHI-5) of SF-36 and depressive symptoms were measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (depression subscale, HADS-D). Established cut-offs for general mental health problems (MHI-5 ≤56) and depressive symptomatology (HADS-D ≥8) were used to dichotomize outcomes. Associations were assessed using logistic regressions.

Results

Lower household income was predominantly associated with poor structural social relationships, whereas financial strain was robustly linked to poor functional social relationships. Financial strain was associated with general mental health problems and depressive symptomatology, even after controlling for social relationships. Education and household income were not linked to mental health. Poor structural and functional social relationships were related to general mental health problems and depressive symptomatology. Notably, trends remained stable after accounting for socioeconomic conditions.

Conclusion

This study provides evidence for socioeconomic inequalities in social relationships as well as for independent associations of financial strain and poor social relationships with mental health problems in individuals with SCI. Further research may develop strategies to improve mental health in SCI by strengthening social relationships. Such interventions may be especially beneficial for individuals with low income and financial strain.

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<![CDATA[Efficient design and analysis of randomized controlled trials in rare neurological diseases: An example in Guillain-Barré syndrome]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c76fe48d5eed0c484e5b7f7

Background

Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) pose specific challenges in rare and heterogeneous neurological diseases due to the small numbers of patients and heterogeneity in disease course. Two analytical approaches have been proposed to optimally handle these issues in RCTs: covariate adjustment and ordinal analysis. We investigated the potential gain in efficiency of these approaches in rare and heterogeneous neurological diseases, using Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) as an example.

Methods

We analyzed two published GBS trials with primary outcome ‘at least one grade improvement’ on the GBS disability scale. We estimated the treatment effect using logistic regression models with and without adjustment for prognostic factors. The difference between the unadjusted and adjusted estimates was disentangled in imbalance (random differences in baseline covariates between treatment arms) and stratification (change of the estimate due to covariate adjustment). Second, we applied proportional odds regression, which exploits the ordinal nature of the GBS disability score. The standard error of the estimated treatment effect indicated the statistical efficiency.

Results

Both trials were slightly imbalanced with respect to baseline characteristics, which was corrected in the adjusted analysis. Covariate adjustment increased the estimated treatment effect in the two trials by 8% and 18% respectively. Proportional odds analysis resulted in lower standard errors indicating more statistical power.

Conclusion

Covariate adjustment and proportional odds analysis most efficiently use the available data and ensure balance between the treatment arms to obtain reliable and valid treatment effect estimates. These approaches merit application in future trials in rare and heterogeneous neurological diseases like GBS.

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<![CDATA[Supported employment: Meta-analysis and review of randomized controlled trials of individual placement and support]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c76fe41d5eed0c484e5b7ab

Supported employment is a treatment whereby those with severe mental illness (or other disabilities) receive aid searching for competitive employment and mental health (or other) treatments concurrently. The most popular implementation of supported employment is individual placement and support (IPS). We conducted meta-analytic analyses of the randomized controlled trials of IPS. We found that subjects in IPS, compared to usual treatment conditions, had better vocational outcomes (obtained any competitive employment: RR = 1.63, 95%CI = [1.46, 1.82]; job tenure: d = 0.55, 95%CI = [0.33, 0.79]; job length: d = 0.46, 95%CI = [0.35, 0.57]; income: d = 0.48, 95%CI = [0.36, 0.59]) Non-vocational outcomes estimates, while favoring IPS, included the null (quality of life: d = 0.30, 95%CI = [-0.07, 0.67]; global functioning: d = 0.09, 95%CI = [-0.09, 0.27]; mental health: d = 0.03, 95%CI = [-0.15, 0.21]). Analysis of the expected proportion of studies with a true effect on non-vocational outcomes with d>0.2 showed some reason to expect a possible improvement for quality of life for at least some settings (Prop = 0.57, 95%CI = [0.30, 0.84]).

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<![CDATA[Pressure redistributing in-seat movement activities by persons with spinal cord injury over multiple epochs]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6dc9fdd5eed0c48452a665

Pressure ulcers, by definition, are caused by external forces on the tissues, often in the regions of bony prominences. Wheelchair users are at risk to develop sitting-acquired pressure ulcers, which occur in the regions of the ischial tuberosities, sacrum/coccyx or greater trochanters. As a means to prevent pressure ulcers, instruction on performing pressure reliefs or weight shifts are a part of the rehabilitation process. The objective of this study was to monitor the weight shift activity of full-time wheelchair users with acute spinal cord injury over multiple epochs of time in order to determine consistency or routine within and across epochs. A second objective was to evaluate the accuracy of self-reported pressure relief frequency within each measurement epoch. A wheelchair in-seat activity monitor was used to measure weight shifts and other in-seat movement. The data was classified into multiple in-seat activity metrics using machine learning. Seventeen full-time wheelchair users with spinal cord injury were measured within multiple epochs, each lasting more than 1 week. Across all in-seat activity metrics, no consistent pattern of activity changes emerged. None of the in-seat activity metric changed in any one direction across a majority of subjects. Subjects tended to over-estimate their frequency of performing pressure reliefs. Self-reported pressure relief behaviors are not reliable, and therefore, cannot be used to evaluate preventative behaviors either clinically or within research. This study had the capability of fully investigating in-seat movements of wheelchair users. The results indicated that in-seat movement does not reflect a routine, either in pressure reliefs, weight shifts or other functional in-seat movements. This study has illustrated the complexity of assigning causation of pressure ulcer occurrence to seated behaviors of wheelchair users and identifies the need for improved clinical techniques designed to develop routine behaviors to prevent pressure ulcers.

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<![CDATA[Virtual supersampling as post-processing step preserves the trabecular bone morphometry in human peripheral quantitative computed tomography scans]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6dc9e5d5eed0c48452a446

In the clinical field of diagnosis and monitoring of bone diseases, high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) is an important imaging modality. It provides a resolution where quantitative bone morphometry can be extracted in vivo on patients. It is known that HR-pQCT provides slight differences in morphometric indices compared to the current standard approach micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). The most obvious reason for this is the restriction of the radiation dose and with this a lower image resolution. With advances in micro-CT evaluation techniques such as patient-specific remodeling simulations or dynamic bone morphometry, a higher image resolution would potentially also allow the application of such novel evaluation techniques to clinical HR-pQCT measurements. Virtual supersampling as post-processing step was considered to increase the image resolution of HR-pQCT scans. The hypothesis was that this technique preserves the structural bone morphometry. Supersampling from 82 μm to virtual 41 μm by trilinear interpolation of the grayscale values of 42 human cadaveric forearms resulted in strong correlations of structural parameters (R2: 0.96–1.00). BV/TV was slightly overestimated (4.3%, R2: 1.00) compared to the HR-pQCT resolution. Tb.N was overestimated (7.47%; R2: 0.99) and Tb.Th was slightly underestimated (-4.20%; R2: 0.98). The technique was reproducible with PE%CV between 1.96% (SMI) and 7.88% (Conn.D). In a clinical setting with 205 human forearms with or without fracture measured at 82 μm resolution HR-pQCT, the technique was sensitive to changes between groups in all parameters (p < 0.05) except trabecular thickness. In conclusion, we demonstrated that supersampling preserves the bone morphometry from HR-pQCT scans and is reproducible and sensitive to changes between groups. Supersampling can be used to investigate on the resolution dependency of HR-pQCT images and gain more insight into this imaging modality.

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<![CDATA[Mortality and morbidity in wild Taiwanese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla pentadactyla)]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c648d1ad5eed0c484c81ffa

Globally, pangolins are threatened by poaching and illegal trade. Taiwan presents a contrary situation, where the wild pangolin population has stabilized and even begun to increase in the last two decades. This paper illustrates the factors responsible for causing mortality and morbidity in the wild Taiwanese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla pentadactyla) based on radio-tracking data of wild pangolins and records of sick or injured pangolins admitted to a Taiwanese wildlife rehabilitation center. Despite being proficient burrowers, results from radio-tracking show that Taiwanese pangolins are highly susceptible to getting trapped in tree hollows or ground burrows. Data from Pingtung Rescue Center for Endangered Wild Animals showed that trauma (73.0%) was the major reason for morbidity in the Taiwanese pangolin with trauma from gin traps being the leading cause (77.8%), especially during the dry season, followed by tail injuries caused by dog attacks (20.4%). Despite these threats, Taiwan has had substantial success in rehabilitating and releasing injured pangolins, primarily due to the close collaboration of Taiwanese wildlife rehabilitation centers over the last twenty years.

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<![CDATA[Development of a risk prediction model (Hangang) and comparison with clinical severity scores in burn patients]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c648ce4d5eed0c484c81a27

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to develop a new prediction model to reflect the risk of mortality and severity of disease and to evaluate the ability of the developed model to predict mortality among adult burn patients.

Methods

This study included 2009 patients aged more than 18 years who were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) within 24 hours after a burn. We divided the patients into two groups; those admitted from January 2007 to December 2013 were included in the derivation group and those admitted from January 2014 to September 2017 were included in the validation group. Shrinkage methods with 10-folds cross-validation were performed to identify variables and limit overfitting of the model. The discrimination was analyzed using the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic curve. The Brier score, integrated discrimination improvement (IDI), and net reclassification improvement (NRI) were also calculated. The calibration was analyzed using the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test (HL test). The clinical usefulness was evaluated using a decision-curve analysis.

Results

The Hangang model showed good calibration with the HL test (χ2 = 8.785, p = 0.361); the highest AUC and the lowest Brier score were 0.943 and 0.068, respectively. The NRI and IDI were 0.124 (p-value = 0.003) and 0.079 (p-value <0.001) when compared with FLAMES, respectively.

Conclusions

This model reflects the current risk factors of mortality among adult burn patients. Furthermore, it was a highly discriminatory and well-calibrated model for the prediction of mortality in this cohort.

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<![CDATA[Trabecular bone score in active or former smokers with and without COPD]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5df35dd5eed0c4845811be

Background

Smoking is a recognized risk factor for osteoporosis. Trabecular bone score (TBS) is a novel texture parameter to evaluate bone microarchitecture. TBS and their main determinants are unknown in active and former smokers.

Objective

To assess TBS in a population of active or former smokers with and without Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and to determine its predictive factors.

Methods

Active and former smokers from a pulmonary clinic were invited to participate. Clinical features were recorded and bone turnover markers (BTMs) measured. Lung function, low dose chest Computed Tomography scans (LDCT), dual energy absorptiometry (DXA) scans were performed and TBS measured. Logistic regression analysis explored the relationship between measured parameters and TBS.

Results

One hundred and forty five patients were included in the analysis, 97 (67.8%) with COPD. TBS was lower in COPD patients (median 1.323; IQR: 0.13 vs 1.48; IQR: 0.16, p = 0.003). Regression analysis showed that a higher body mass index (BMI), younger age, less number of exacerbations and a higher forced expiratory volume-one second (FEV1%) was associated with better TBS (β = 0.005, 95% CI:0.000–0.011, p = 0.032; β = -0.003, 95% CI:-0.007(-)-0.000, p = 0.008; β = -0.019, 95% CI:-0.034(-)-0.004, p = 0.015; β = 0.001, 95% CI:0.000–0.002, p = 0.012 respectively). The same factors with similar results were found in COPD patients.

Conclusions

A significant proportion of active and former smokers with and without COPD have an affected TBS. BMI, age, number of exacerbations and the degree of airway obstruction predicts TBS values in smokers with and without COPD. This important information should be considered when evaluating smokers at risk of osteoporosis.

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<![CDATA[The stability of long-segment and short-segment fixation for treating severe burst fractures at the thoracolumbar junction in osteoporotic bone: A finite element analysis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c61e8dbd5eed0c48496f278

The majority of compressive vertebral fractures in osteoporotic bone occur at the level of the thoracolumbar junction. Immediate decompression is often required in order to reduce the extent of neurological damage. This study evaluated four fixation methods for decompression in patients with thoracolumbar burst fractures, and presented the most suitable method for osteoporotic patients. A finite element model of a T7–L5 spinal segment was created and subjected to an L1 corpectomy to simulate a serious burst fracture. Five models were tested: a) intact spine; 2) two segment fixation (TSF), 3) up-three segment fixation (UTSF), below-three segment fixation (BTSF), and four segment fixation (FSF). The ROM, stiffness and compression ratio of the fractured vertebra were recorded under various loading conditions. The results of this study showed that the ROM of the FSF model was the lowest, and the ROMs of UTSF and BTSF models were similar but still greater than the TSF model. Decreasing the BMD to simulate osteoporotic bone resulted in a ROM for the four instrumented models that was higher than the normal bone model. Of all models, the FSF model had the highest stiffness at T12-L2 in extension and lateral bending. Similarly, the compression ratio of the FSF model at L1 was also higher than the other instrumented models. In conclusion, FSF fixation is suggested for patients with osteoporotic thoracolumbar burst fractures. For patients with normal bone quality, both UTSF and BTSF fixation provide an acceptable stiffness in extension and lateral bending, as well as a favorable compression ratio at L1.

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<![CDATA[Mortality in trauma patients admitted during, before, and after national academic emergency medicine and trauma surgery meeting dates in Japan]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c59fea7d5eed0c4841351fd

Annually, many physicians attend national academic meetings. While participating in these meetings can have a positive impact on daily medical practice, attendance may result in reduced medical staffing during the meeting dates. We sought to examine whether there were differences in mortality after trauma among patients admitted to the hospital during, before, and after meeting dates. Using the Japan Trauma Data Bank, we analyzed in-hospital mortality in patients with traumatic injury admitted to the hospital from 2004 to 2015 during the dates of two national academic meetings—the Japanese Association for Acute Medicine (JAAM) and the Japanese Association for the Surgery of Trauma (JAST). We compared the data with that of patients admitted with trauma during identical weekdays in the weeks before and after the meetings, respectively. We used multiple logistic regression analysis to compare outcomes among the three groups. A total of 7,491 patients were included in our analyses, with 2,481, 2,492, and 2,518 patients in the during, before, and after meeting dates groups, respectively; their mortality rates were 7.3%, 8.0%, and 8.5%, respectively. After adjusting for covariates, no significant differences in in-hospital mortality were found among the three groups (adjusted odds ratio [95% CI] of the before meeting dates and after meeting dates groups; 1.18 [0.89–1.56] and 1.23 [0.93–1.63], respectively, with the during meeting dates group as the reference category). No significant differences in in-hospital mortality were found among trauma patients admitted during, before, and after the JAAM and JAST meeting dates.

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<![CDATA[Trauma induced acute kidney injury]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c57e693d5eed0c484ef37fb

Background

Injured patients are at risk of developing acute kidney injury (AKI), which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to describe the incidence, timing, and severity of AKI in a large trauma population, identify risk factors for AKI, and report mortality outcomes.

Methods

A prospective observational study of injured adults, who met local criteria for trauma team activation, and were admitted to a UK Major Trauma Centre. AKI was defined by the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard modelling was used to analyse parameters associated with AKI and mortality.

Results

Of the 1410 patients enrolled in the study, 178 (12.6%) developed AKI. Age; injury severity score (ISS); admission systolic blood pressure, lactate and serum creatinine; units of Packed Red Blood Cells transfused in first 24 hours and administration of nephrotoxic therapy were identified as independent risk factors for the development of AKI. Patients that developed AKI had significantly higher mortality than those with normal renal function (47/178 [26.4%] versus 128/1232 [10.4%]; OR 3.09 [2.12 to 4.53]; p<0.0001). After adjusting for other clinical prognostic factors, AKI was an independent risk factor for mortality.

Conclusions

AKI is a frequent complication following trauma and is associated with prolonged hospital length of stay and increased mortality. Future research is needed to improve our ability to rapidly identify those at risk of AKI, and develop resuscitation strategies that preserve renal function in trauma patients.

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<![CDATA[Epidemiology of low-energy lower extremity fracture in Chinese populations aged 50 years and above]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c46657fd5eed0c484519799

This study aimed to investigate the epidemiology of low-energy lower-extremity fracture in Chinese men and women aged 50 years and above. This study was a part of Chinese National Fracture Survey (CNFS), which used the stratified multistage cluster random sampling method to recruit subjects between January and May 2015. A total of 512187 individuals participated in the CNFS and of them there were 154099 men and women aged 50 years and above included in this study for data analysis. Low-energy fracture was defined as a fracture caused by slip, trip or fall from standing height. Univariate analyses and gender-based multivariate logistic regression models were constructed to identify the independent risk factors. A total of 215 patients had sustained low-energy lower extremity fractures in 2014, indicating the overall incidence was 139.5 (120.9 to 158.2) per 100000 persons, with 127.8 (102.5 to 153.1) and 151.1 (123.8 to 178.5) per 100000 person-year in men and women. Over 80% of fractures occurred at home and on the common road. In men, alcohol consumption (OR, 2.00; 95%CI, 1.29 to 3.08), sleep duration<7h/d (OR, 2.60; 95%CI, 1.68 to 4.03) and history of past fracture (OR, 2.57; 95%CI, 1.33 to 4.95) were identified as significant risk factors associated with low-energy fractures. In women, advanced age (80+ years) (OR, 3.22; 95%CI, 1.80 to 5.75), alcohol consumption(OR, 1.72; 95%CI, 1.00 to 2.98), sleep duration <7h/d (OR, 2.11; 95%CI, 1.40 to 3.18), and history of past fracture (OR, 3.46; 95%CI, 1.97 to 6.09) were identified as significant risk factors and living in western region (OR, 0.60; 95%CI, 0.38 to 0.94) and current weight of 50 to 59.9 kg (OR, 0.17; 95%CI, 0.04 to 0.73) were identified as protective factors for fractures. Accordingly, awareness on the importance of sleep and alcohol consumption on fragility fracture should be improved, and health policies that focus on decreasing alcohol consumption and encouraging individuals to improve their sleep quality and duration should be considered. Maintaining a healthy bodyweight for women should be specifically emphasized to prevent low-energy fractures.

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<![CDATA[Bioarchaeological evidence of decapitation from Pacopampa in the northern Peruvian highlands]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c3e4f32d5eed0c484d72cf7

Little is known about the precise date of the emergence of decapitation in a ritual context and the presence of systematic postmortem modification patterns in the ancient Central Andes. The ceremonial complex at Pacopampa in the northern Peruvian highlands provides early osteological evidence of decapitation in six individuals dating to the latter half of the Late–Final Formative Periods (500–50 BC) and to the Early Cajamarca Period (AD 200–450). Based on osteological evidence, and when taken together with archaeological settings and settlement patterns, researchers can be certain that those whose heads were disembodied were not likely to have been involved in organized battles. In addition, the similarities in the cut-mark distribution, direction, and cross-sectional morphology of each individual's remains, as well as the characteristics of selected individuals, imply that the decapitated individuals were carefully prepared using a standardized method and that those who modified the heads may have been professional decapitators. This study offers indisputable bioarchaeological evidence of ritualistic offerings of human skulls and systematic postmortem modification patterns, which is consistent with a contemporaneous iconographic motif of decapitation and extends the chronology of this practice back to the Formative Period in the northern Peruvian highlands.

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<![CDATA[Experiences of treadmill walking with non-immersive virtual reality after stroke or acquired brain injury – A qualitative study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c1d5b9dd5eed0c4846ec232

Objectives

It is well known that physical activity levels for persons after stroke or acquired brain injuries do not reach existing recommendations. Walking training is highly important since the ability to walk is considered to be a meaningful occupation for most people, and is often reduced after a brain injury. This suggests a need to innovate stroke rehabilitation, so that forms of walking training that are user-friendly and enjoyable can be provided.

Method

An interview study was carried out with persons after stroke (n = 8), or acquired brain injury (n = 2) at a rehabilitation unit at Sahlgrenska University Hospital. We used a semi-structured interview guide to investigate experiences and thoughts about walking on a treadmill with non-immersive virtual reality feedback. The contents were analyzed through an inductive approach, using qualitative content analysis.

Results

The virtual reality experience was perceived as enjoyable, exciting, and challenging. Participants stressed that the visual and auditory feedback increased their motivation to walk on a treadmill. However, for some participants, the virtual reality experience was too challenging, and extreme tiredness or fatigue were reported after the walking session.

Conclusions

Participants’ thoughts and experiences indicated that the Virtual Reality walking system could serve as a complement to more traditional forms of walking training. Early after a brain injury, virtual reality could be a way to train the ability to handle individually adapted multisensory input while walking. Obvious benefits were that participants perceived it as engaging and exciting.

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<![CDATA[Thiazide-associated hyponatremia attenuates the fracture-protective effect of thiazide: A population-based study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c141eecd5eed0c484d28d87

Background

Thiazide, a first-line therapy for hypertension, lowers blood pressure, increases bone mineral density, and reduces the risk of fractures. However, hyponatremia, an adverse effect of thiazide, is associated with increased risk of osteoporosis and fractures. It is currently unclear whether thiazide-associated hyponatremia (TAH) outweighs the protective effects of thiazide.

Methods

Using data from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified patients who were prescribed thiazide between 1998 and 2010. Those diagnosed with hyponatremia within three years after initiation of thiazide were selected for the TAH group. Thiazide users without hyponatremia were selected for the control group. The association between TAH and fracture risk was further evaluated using multivariable Cox regression models adjusted for comorbidities and medications. Subjects were followed up from the index date until the appearance of a fracture, death, or the end of a 3-year period.

Results

A total of 1212 patients were included in the TAH group, matched with 4848 patients in the control group. The incidence rate of fracture was higher in the TAH group than in the control group (31.4 versus 20.6 per 1000 person-years). TAH was associated with a higher risk of total fractures (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 1.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.15–1.88), vertebra fractures (aHR: 1.84, 95% CI = 1.12–3.01), and hip fractures (aHR: 1.66, 95% CI = 1.12–2.46) after controlling for comorbidities and other medications.

Conclusions

Thiazide users with hyponatremia have a higher risk of fracture than thiazide users without hyponatremia. The fracture-protective effect of thiazide is attenuated by TAH.

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