ResearchPad - vector-spaces https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[The Language of Innovation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_10245 Predicting innovation is a peculiar problem in data science. Following its definition, an innovation is always a never-seen-before event, leaving no room for traditional supervised learning approaches. Here we propose a strategy to address the problem in the context of innovative patents, by defining innovations as never-seen-before associations of technologies and exploiting self-supervised learning techniques. We think of technological codes present in patents as a vocabulary and the whole technological corpus as written in a specific, evolving language. We leverage such structure with techniques borrowed from Natural Language Processing by embedding technologies in a high dimensional euclidean space where relative positions are representative of learned semantics. Proximity in this space is an effective predictor of specific innovation events, that outperforms a wide range of standard link-prediction metrics. The success of patented innovations follows a complex dynamics characterized by different patterns which we analyze in details with specific examples. The methods proposed in this paper provide a completely new way of understanding and forecasting innovation, by tackling it from a revealing perspective and opening interesting scenarios for a number of applications and further analytic approaches.

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<![CDATA[Modeling musculoskeletal kinematic and dynamic redundancy using null space projection]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c366805d5eed0c4841a6e05

The coordination of the human musculoskeletal system is deeply influenced by its redundant structure, in both kinematic and dynamic terms. Noticing a lack of a relevant, thorough treatment in the literature, we formally address the issue in order to understand and quantify factors affecting the motor coordination. We employed well-established techniques from linear algebra and projection operators to extend the underlying kinematic and dynamic relations by modeling the redundancy effects in null space. We distinguish three types of operational spaces, namely task, joint and muscle space, which are directly associated with the physiological factors of the system. A method for consistently quantifying the redundancy on multiple levels in the entire space of feasible solutions is also presented. We evaluate the proposed muscle space projection on segmental level reflexes and the computation of the feasible muscle forces for arbitrary movements. The former proves to be a convenient representation for interfacing with segmental level models or implementing controllers for tendon driven robots, while the latter enables the identification of force variability and correlations between muscle groups, attributed to the system’s redundancy. Furthermore, the usefulness of the proposed framework is demonstrated in the context of estimating the bounds of the joint reaction loads, where we show that misinterpretation of the results is possible if the null space forces are ignored. This work presents a theoretical analysis of the redundancy problem, facilitating application in a broad range of fields related to motor coordination, as it provides the groundwork for null space characterization. The proposed framework rigorously accounts for the effects of kinematic and dynamic redundancy, incorporating it directly into the underlying equations using the notion of null space projection, leading to a complete description of the system.

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<![CDATA[Validating quantum-classical programming models with tensor network simulations]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c1813c3d5eed0c484775c05

The exploration of hybrid quantum-classical algorithms and programming models on noisy near-term quantum hardware has begun. As hybrid programs scale towards classical intractability, validation and benchmarking are critical to understanding the utility of the hybrid computational model. In this paper, we demonstrate a newly developed quantum circuit simulator based on tensor network theory that enables intermediate-scale verification and validation of hybrid quantum-classical computing frameworks and programming models. We present our tensor-network quantum virtual machine (TNQVM) simulator which stores a multi-qubit wavefunction in a compressed (factorized) form as a matrix product state, thus enabling single-node simulations of larger qubit registers, as compared to brute-force state-vector simulators. Our simulator is designed to be extensible in both the tensor network form and the classical hardware used to run the simulation (multicore, GPU, distributed). The extensibility of the TNQVM simulator with respect to the simulation hardware type is achieved via a pluggable interface for different numerical backends (e.g., ITensor and ExaTENSOR numerical libraries). We demonstrate the utility of our TNQVM quantum circuit simulator through the verification of randomized quantum circuits and the variational quantum eigensolver algorithm, both expressed within the eXtreme-scale ACCelerator (XACC) programming model.

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<![CDATA[Semantic algorithms can detect how media language shapes survey responses in organizational behaviour]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c117b80d5eed0c48469977f

Research on sensemaking in organisations and on linguistic relativity suggests that speakers of the same language may use this language in different ways to construct social realities at work. We apply a semantic theory of survey response (STSR) to explore such differences in quantitative survey research. Using text analysis algorithms, we have studied how language from three media domains–the business press, PR Newswire and general newspapers–has differential explanatory value for analysing survey responses in leadership research. We projected well-known surveys measuring leadership, motivation and outcomes into large text samples from these three media domains significantly different impacts on survey responses. Business press language was best in explaining leadership-related items, PR language best at explaining organizational results and “ordinary” newspaper language seemed to explain the relationship among motivation items. These findings shed light on how different public arenas construct organizational realities in different ways, and how these differences have consequences on methodology in research on leadership.

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<![CDATA[Relevance popularity: A term event model based feature selection scheme for text classification]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db50ab0ee8fa60bdc191

Feature selection is a practical approach for improving the performance of text classification methods by optimizing the feature subsets input to classifiers. In traditional feature selection methods such as information gain and chi-square, the number of documents that contain a particular term (i.e. the document frequency) is often used. However, the frequency of a given term appearing in each document has not been fully investigated, even though it is a promising feature to produce accurate classifications. In this paper, we propose a new feature selection scheme based on a term event Multinomial naive Bayes probabilistic model. According to the model assumptions, the matching score function, which is based on the prediction probability ratio, can be factorized. Finally, we derive a feature selection measurement for each term after replacing inner parameters by their estimators. On a benchmark English text datasets (20 Newsgroups) and a Chinese text dataset (MPH-20), our numerical experiment results obtained from using two widely used text classifiers (naive Bayes and support vector machine) demonstrate that our method outperformed the representative feature selection methods.

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<![CDATA[Multivariate Multi-Objective Allocation in Stratified Random Sampling: A Game Theoretic Approach]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db34ab0ee8fa60bd288c

We consider the problem of multivariate multi-objective allocation where no or limited information is available within the stratum variance. Results show that a game theoretic approach (based on weighted goal programming) can be applied to sample size allocation problems. We use simulation technique to determine payoff matrix and to solve a minimax game.

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<![CDATA[Identification of Conserved Moieties in Metabolic Networks by Graph Theoretical Analysis of Atom Transition Networks]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989daa5ab0ee8fa60ba71b1

Conserved moieties are groups of atoms that remain intact in all reactions of a metabolic network. Identification of conserved moieties gives insight into the structure and function of metabolic networks and facilitates metabolic modelling. All moiety conservation relations can be represented as nonnegative integer vectors in the left null space of the stoichiometric matrix corresponding to a biochemical network. Algorithms exist to compute such vectors based only on reaction stoichiometry but their computational complexity has limited their application to relatively small metabolic networks. Moreover, the vectors returned by existing algorithms do not, in general, represent conservation of a specific moiety with a defined atomic structure. Here, we show that identification of conserved moieties requires data on reaction atom mappings in addition to stoichiometry. We present a novel method to identify conserved moieties in metabolic networks by graph theoretical analysis of their underlying atom transition networks. Our method returns the exact group of atoms belonging to each conserved moiety as well as the corresponding vector in the left null space of the stoichiometric matrix. It can be implemented as a pipeline of polynomial time algorithms. Our implementation completes in under five minutes on a metabolic network with more than 4,000 mass balanced reactions. The scalability of the method enables extension of existing applications for moiety conservation relations to genome-scale metabolic networks. We also give examples of new applications made possible by elucidating the atomic structure of conserved moieties.

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<![CDATA[Identifying Topics in Microblogs Using Wikipedia]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da32ab0ee8fa60b84bd8

Twitter is an extremely high volume platform for user generated contributions regarding any topic. The wealth of content created at real-time in massive quantities calls for automated approaches to identify the topics of the contributions. Such topics can be utilized in numerous ways, such as public opinion mining, marketing, entertainment, and disaster management. Towards this end, approaches to relate single or partial posts to knowledge base items have been proposed. However, in microblogging systems like Twitter, topics emerge from the culmination of a large number of contributions. Therefore, identifying topics based on collections of posts, where individual posts contribute to some aspect of the greater topic is necessary. Models, such as Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA), propose algorithms for relating collections of posts to sets of keywords that represent underlying topics. In these approaches, figuring out what the specific topic(s) the keyword sets represent remains as a separate task. Another issue in topic detection is the scope, which is often limited to specific domain, such as health. This work proposes an approach for identifying domain-independent specific topics related to sets of posts. In this approach, individual posts are processed and then aggregated to identify key tokens, which are then mapped to specific topics. Wikipedia article titles are selected to represent topics, since they are up to date, user-generated, sophisticated articles that span topics of human interest. This paper describes the proposed approach, a prototype implementation, and a case study based on data gathered during the heavily contributed periods corresponding to the four US election debates in 2012. The manually evaluated results (0.96 precision) and other observations from the study are discussed in detail.

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<![CDATA[Second-Order Systematicity of Associative Learning: A Paradox for Classical Compositionality and a Coalgebraic Resolution]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989daa6ab0ee8fa60ba7bfd

Systematicity is a property of cognitive architecture whereby having certain cognitive capacities implies having certain other “structurally related” cognitive capacities. The predominant classical explanation for systematicity appeals to a notion of common syntactic/symbolic structure among the systematically related capacities. Although learning is a (second-order) cognitive capacity of central interest to cognitive science, a systematic ability to learn certain cognitive capacities, i.e., second-order systematicity, has been given almost no attention in the literature. In this paper, we introduce learned associations as an instance of second-order systematicity that poses a paradox for classical theory, because this form of systematicity involves the kinds of associative constructions that were explicitly rejected by the classical explanation. Our category theoretic explanation of systematicity resolves this problem, because both first and second-order forms of systematicity are derived from the same categorical construction: universal morphisms, which generalize the notion of compositionality of constituent representations to (categorical) compositionality of constituent processes. We derive a model of systematic associative learning based on (co)recursion, which is an instance of a universal construction. These results provide further support for a category theory foundation for cognitive architecture.

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<![CDATA[Understanding Karma Police: The Perceived Plausibility of Noun Compounds as Predicted by Distributional Models of Semantic Representation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da0dab0ee8fa60b78276

Noun compounds, consisting of two nouns (the head and the modifier) that are combined into a single concept, differ in terms of their plausibility: school bus is a more plausible compound than saddle olive. The present study investigates which factors influence the plausibility of attested and novel noun compounds. Distributional Semantic Models (DSMs) are used to obtain formal (vector) representations of word meanings, and compositional methods in DSMs are employed to obtain such representations for noun compounds. From these representations, different plausibility measures are computed. Three of those measures contribute in predicting the plausibility of noun compounds: The relatedness between the meaning of the head noun and the compound (Head Proximity), the relatedness between the meaning of modifier noun and the compound (Modifier Proximity), and the similarity between the head noun and the modifier noun (Constituent Similarity). We find non-linear interactions between Head Proximity and Modifier Proximity, as well as between Modifier Proximity and Constituent Similarity. Furthermore, Constituent Similarity interacts non-linearly with the familiarity with the compound. These results suggest that a compound is perceived as more plausible if it can be categorized as an instance of the category denoted by the head noun, if the contribution of the modifier to the compound meaning is clear but not redundant, and if the constituents are sufficiently similar in cases where this contribution is not clear. Furthermore, compounds are perceived to be more plausible if they are more familiar, but mostly for cases where the relation between the constituents is less clear.

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<![CDATA[Discrimination in lexical decision]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db50ab0ee8fa60bdbd05

In this study we present a novel set of discrimination-based indicators of language processing derived from Naive Discriminative Learning (ndl) theory. We compare the effectiveness of these new measures with classical lexical-distributional measures—in particular, frequency counts and form similarity measures—to predict lexical decision latencies when a complete morphological segmentation of masked primes is or is not possible. Data derive from a re-analysis of a large subset of decision latencies from the English Lexicon Project, as well as from the results of two new masked priming studies. Results demonstrate the superiority of discrimination-based predictors over lexical-distributional predictors alone, across both the simple and primed lexical decision tasks. Comparable priming after masked corner and cornea type primes, across two experiments, fails to support early obligatory segmentation into morphemes as predicted by the morpho-orthographic account of reading. Results fit well with ndl theory, which, in conformity with Word and Paradigm theory, rejects the morpheme as a relevant unit of analysis. Furthermore, results indicate that readers with greater spelling proficiency and larger vocabularies make better use of orthographic priors and handle lexical competition more efficiently.

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<![CDATA[Tiled vector data model for the geographical features of symbolized maps]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5aab0ee8fa60bdf54a

Electronic maps (E-maps) provide people with convenience in real-world space. Although web map services can display maps on screens, a more important function is their ability to access geographical features. An E-map that is based on raster tiles is inferior to vector tiles in terms of interactive ability because vector maps provide a convenient and effective method to access and manipulate web map features. However, the critical issue regarding rendering tiled vector maps is that geographical features that are rendered in the form of map symbols via vector tiles may cause visual discontinuities, such as graphic conflicts and losses of data around the borders of tiles, which likely represent the main obstacles to exploring vector map tiles on the web. This paper proposes a tiled vector data model for geographical features in symbolized maps that considers the relationships among geographical features, symbol representations and map renderings. This model presents a method to tailor geographical features in terms of map symbols and ‘addition’ (join) operations on the following two levels: geographical features and map features. Thus, these maps can resolve the visual discontinuity problem based on the proposed model without weakening the interactivity of vector maps. The proposed model is validated by two map data sets, and the results demonstrate that the rendered (symbolized) web maps present smooth visual continuity.

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<![CDATA[Zooming in: From spatially extended traveling waves to localized structures: The case of the Sine-Gordon equation in (1+3) dimensions]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db52ab0ee8fa60bdc993

The Sine-Gordon equation in (1+3) dimensions has N-traveling front (“kink”, “domain wall”)- solutions for all N ≥ 1. A nonlinear functional of the solution, which vanishes on a single-front, maps multi-front solutions onto sets of infinitely long, but laterally bounded, rods, which move in space. Each rod is localized in the vicinity of the intersection of two Sine-Gordon fronts. The rod systems are solutions of the linear wave equation, driven by a term that is constructed out of Sine-Gordon fronts. An additional linear operation maps multi-rod systems onto sets of blobs. Each blob is localized in the vicinity of rod intersection, and moves in space. The blob systems are solutions of the linear wave equation, driven by a term that is also constructed out of Sine-Gordon fronts. The temporal evolution of multi-blob solutions mimics elastic collisions of systems of spatially extended particles.

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<![CDATA[MR Image Reconstruction Using Block Matching and Adaptive Kernel Methods]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da83ab0ee8fa60b9b89d

An approach to Magnetic Resonance (MR) image reconstruction from undersampled data is proposed. Undersampling artifacts are removed using an iterative thresholding algorithm applied to nonlinearly transformed image block arrays. Each block array is transformed using kernel principal component analysis where the contribution of each image block to the transform depends in a nonlinear fashion on the distance to other image blocks. Elimination of undersampling artifacts is achieved by conventional principal component analysis in the nonlinear transform domain, projection onto the main components and back-mapping into the image domain. Iterative image reconstruction is performed by interleaving the proposed undersampling artifact removal step and gradient updates enforcing consistency with acquired k-space data. The algorithm is evaluated using retrospectively undersampled MR cardiac cine data and compared to k-t SPARSE-SENSE, block matching with spatial Fourier filtering and k-t ℓ1-SPIRiT reconstruction. Evaluation of image quality and root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) reveal improved image reconstruction for up to 8-fold undersampled data with the proposed approach relative to k-t SPARSE-SENSE, block matching with spatial Fourier filtering and k-t ℓ1-SPIRiT. In conclusion, block matching and kernel methods can be used for effective removal of undersampling artifacts in MR image reconstruction and outperform methods using standard compressed sensing and 1-regularized parallel imaging methods.

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<![CDATA[Density-based clustering: A ‘landscape view’ of multi-channel neural data for inference and dynamic complexity analysis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db50ab0ee8fa60bdc17f

Two, partially interwoven, hot topics in the analysis and statistical modeling of neural data, are the development of efficient and informative representations of the time series derived from multiple neural recordings, and the extraction of information about the connectivity structure of the underlying neural network from the recorded neural activities. In the present paper we show that state-space clustering can provide an easy and effective option for reducing the dimensionality of multiple neural time series, that it can improve inference of synaptic couplings from neural activities, and that it can also allow the construction of a compact representation of the multi-dimensional dynamics, that easily lends itself to complexity measures. We apply a variant of the ‘mean-shift’ algorithm to perform state-space clustering, and validate it on an Hopfield network in the glassy phase, in which metastable states are largely uncorrelated from memories embedded in the synaptic matrix. In this context, we show that the neural states identified as clusters’ centroids offer a parsimonious parametrization of the synaptic matrix, which allows a significant improvement in inferring the synaptic couplings from the neural activities. Moving to the more realistic case of a multi-modular spiking network, with spike-frequency adaptation inducing history-dependent effects, we propose a procedure inspired by Boltzmann learning, but extending its domain of application, to learn inter-module synaptic couplings so that the spiking network reproduces a prescribed pattern of spatial correlations; we then illustrate, in the spiking network, how clustering is effective in extracting relevant features of the network’s state-space landscape. Finally, we show that the knowledge of the cluster structure allows casting the multi-dimensional neural dynamics in the form of a symbolic dynamics of transitions between clusters; as an illustration of the potential of such reduction, we define and analyze a measure of complexity of the neural time series.

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<![CDATA[From elementary flux modes to elementary flux vectors: Metabolic pathway analysis with arbitrary linear flux constraints]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5aab0ee8fa60bdf400

Elementary flux modes (EFMs) emerged as a formal concept to describe metabolic pathways and have become an established tool for constraint-based modeling and metabolic network analysis. EFMs are characteristic (support-minimal) vectors of the flux cone that contains all feasible steady-state flux vectors of a given metabolic network. EFMs account for (homogeneous) linear constraints arising from reaction irreversibilities and the assumption of steady state; however, other (inhomogeneous) linear constraints, such as minimal and maximal reaction rates frequently used by other constraint-based techniques (such as flux balance analysis [FBA]), cannot be directly integrated. These additional constraints further restrict the space of feasible flux vectors and turn the flux cone into a general flux polyhedron in which the concept of EFMs is not directly applicable anymore. For this reason, there has been a conceptual gap between EFM-based (pathway) analysis methods and linear optimization (FBA) techniques, as they operate on different geometric objects. One approach to overcome these limitations was proposed ten years ago and is based on the concept of elementary flux vectors (EFVs). Only recently has the community started to recognize the potential of EFVs for metabolic network analysis. In fact, EFVs exactly represent the conceptual development required to generalize the idea of EFMs from flux cones to flux polyhedra. This work aims to present a concise theoretical and practical introduction to EFVs that is accessible to a broad audience. We highlight the close relationship between EFMs and EFVs and demonstrate that almost all applications of EFMs (in flux cones) are possible for EFVs (in flux polyhedra) as well. In fact, certain properties can only be studied with EFVs. Thus, we conclude that EFVs provide a powerful and unifying framework for constraint-based modeling of metabolic networks.

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<![CDATA[SVM and SVM Ensembles in Breast Cancer Prediction]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da16ab0ee8fa60b7b343

Breast cancer is an all too common disease in women, making how to effectively predict it an active research problem. A number of statistical and machine learning techniques have been employed to develop various breast cancer prediction models. Among them, support vector machines (SVM) have been shown to outperform many related techniques. To construct the SVM classifier, it is first necessary to decide the kernel function, and different kernel functions can result in different prediction performance. However, there have been very few studies focused on examining the prediction performances of SVM based on different kernel functions. Moreover, it is unknown whether SVM classifier ensembles which have been proposed to improve the performance of single classifiers can outperform single SVM classifiers in terms of breast cancer prediction. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to fully assess the prediction performance of SVM and SVM ensembles over small and large scale breast cancer datasets. The classification accuracy, ROC, F-measure, and computational times of training SVM and SVM ensembles are compared. The experimental results show that linear kernel based SVM ensembles based on the bagging method and RBF kernel based SVM ensembles with the boosting method can be the better choices for a small scale dataset, where feature selection should be performed in the data pre-processing stage. For a large scale dataset, RBF kernel based SVM ensembles based on boosting perform better than the other classifiers.

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<![CDATA[Dynamic compensation, parameter identifiability, and equivariances]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5aab0ee8fa60bdf33a

A recent paper by Karin et al. introduced a mathematical notion called dynamical compensation (DC) of biological circuits. DC was shown to play an important role in glucose homeostasis as well as other key physiological regulatory mechanisms. Karin et al. went on to provide a sufficient condition to test whether a given system has the DC property. Here, we show how DC can be formulated in terms of a well-known concept in systems biology, statistics, and control theory—that of parameter structural non-identifiability. Viewing DC as a parameter identification problem enables one to take advantage of powerful theoretical and computational tools to test a system for DC. We obtain as a special case the sufficient criterion discussed by Karin et al. We also draw connections to system equivalence and to the fold-change detection property.

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<![CDATA[The Role of Familiarity for Representations in Norm-Based Face Space]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db3aab0ee8fa60bd490d

According to the norm-based version of the multidimensional face space model (nMDFS, Valentine, 1991), any given face and its corresponding anti-face (which deviates from the norm in exactly opposite direction as the original face) should be equidistant to a hypothetical prototype face (norm), such that by definition face and anti-face should bear the same level of perceived typicality. However, it has been argued that familiarity affects perceived typicality and that representations of familiar faces are qualitatively different (e.g., more robust and image-independent) from those for unfamiliar faces. Here we investigated the role of face familiarity for rated typicality, using two frequently used operationalisations of typicality (deviation-based: DEV), and distinctiveness (face in the crowd: FITC) for faces of celebrities and their corresponding anti-faces. We further assessed attractiveness, likeability and trustworthiness ratings of the stimuli, which are potentially related to typicality. For unfamiliar faces and their corresponding anti-faces, in line with the predictions of the nMDFS, our results demonstrate comparable levels of perceived typicality (DEV). In contrast, familiar faces were perceived much less typical than their anti-faces. Furthermore, familiar faces were rated higher than their anti-faces in distinctiveness, attractiveness, likability and trustworthiness. These findings suggest that familiarity strongly affects the distribution of facial representations in norm-based face space. Overall, our study suggests (1) that familiarity needs to be considered in studies of mental representations of faces, and (2) that familiarity, general distance-to-norm and more specific vector directions in face space make different and interactive contributions to different types of facial evaluations.

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<![CDATA[Spatially Extended Relativistic Particles Out of Traveling Front Solutions of Sine-Gordon Equation in (1+2) Dimensions]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9d4ab0ee8fa60b6519d

Slower-than-light multi-front solutions of the Sine-Gordon in (1+2) dimensions, constructed through the Hirota algorithm, are mapped onto spatially localized structures, which emulate free, spatially extended, massive relativistic particles. A localized structure is an image of the junctions at which the fronts intersect. It propagates together with the multi-front solution at the velocity of the latter. The profile of the localized structure obeys the linear wave equation in (1+2) dimensions, to which a term that represents interaction with a slower-than-light, Sine-Gordon-multi-front solution has been added. This result can be also formulated in terms of a (1+2)-dimensional Lagrangian system, in which the Sine-Gordon and wave equations are coupled. Expanding the Euler-Lagrange equations in powers of the coupling constant, the zero-order part of the solution reproduces the (1+2)-dimensional Sine-Gordon fronts. The first-order part is the spatially localized structure. PACS: 02.30.Ik, 03.65.Pm, 05.45.Yv, 02.30.Ik.

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